Towards more inclusive, cooperative and participative climate change interventions in Kenya, Ghana and Burkina Faso

Towards more inclusive, cooperative and participative climate change interventions in Kenya, Ghana and Burkina Faso, or TICCI project has looked at enhancing people’s adaptive capacity to climate change, particularly focusing on small-scale farmers and pastoralists in the arid and semi-arid regions of Ghana, Burkina Faso and Kenya. The project has analysed to what extent existing sets of interventions help local groups to make farming systems more resilient; and supported people to better deal with unexpected events and extreme weather conditions, while taking into account that climate variability will generate shifting routes and new mobilities.

CCMCC | Presentation TICCI | Adaptation Futures 2018

Progress

Our project aims to gain a better understanding of the linkages between climate change adaptation interventions and the resilience of competing livelihood systems in semi-arid and sub-humid belts in Africa in relation to conflicts and cooperation. Drawing from empirical cases in Ghana, Kenya and Burkina Faso, we find that Adaptation Interventions tend to target (usually sedentary) beneficiary groups (farmers, communities, women, youth etc.), at the expense of non-beneficiary groups (for instance, pastoralist groups). By artificially isolating of target groups, and at the same time with an altering the availability, distribution, and access to, local natural resources, adaptation interventions may serve as a source of conflict. We propose, in contrast to community-based approaches, that practitioners adopt landscape approaches, using as a point of departure, local natural resources within landscapes, and the relationships (between for instance, farmers and pastoralists) through which those resources are accessed and distributed.

Output

Video

TICCI - From research to policy - a conversation on pastoralism
DFID’s Howard Standen speaks to the TICCI project’s Dr Sebastiaan Soeters about the impacts of adaptation programmes in African drylands and how these have resulted in conflict between farmers and pastoralists. The two discuss the approach taken by the TICCI project and how its findings were able to influence policy development in Ghana.

 

Summary

As a response to increasing climate variability, national governments, international organizations and NGOs are currently implementing new types of policies aimed at climate change adaptation and mitigation. Climate variability sometimes goes hand in hand with conflict situations (e.g. pastoralists versus farmers), but it can also be reason for solidarity and new types of collaboration. Little is known about the role of interventions in preventing these conflicts and/or offering new perspectives for collaboration, or making livelihood systems more resilient.

The aim of our project is enhance people's adaptive capacity to climate change, particularly focusing on small-scale farmers and pastoralists in the arid and semi-arid regions of Ghana, Burkina Faso and Kenya.

The main elements of adaptive capacity are inclusiveness and participation in decision-making, access to assets, innovation, knowledge, and strengthening institutions. As such, our project particularly focuses on increasing inclusiveness, participation and conflict-sensitivity of climate change interventions directed at farmers and pastoralists; and on the ways to prevent conflicts and/or contribute to conflict resolution.

Our project aims to arrive at a thorough contribution to understanding the links between community participation in development; local power relations; inter and intra community conflict / cooperation; climate change interventions, and people's adaptative capacity. We will conduct high-quality and participatory research and generate in-depth, long-term, comparative and interdisciplinary knowledge on climate change adaptation interventions from the local perspective.

The aim is to analyse to what extent existing sets of interventions help local groups to make farming systems more resilient; support people to better deal with unexpected events and extreme weather conditions, while taking into account that climate variability will generate shifting routes and new mobilities.
Acknowledging the differences in geography and institutional set-up, our research aims to attune climate change adaptation interventions to local realities. Our project will contribute to the formulation of 'community-smart' climate change adaptation policies, which will be achieved in close connection with the communities, policy makers and practitioners.

Knowledge will be directly used to make climate change adaptation interventions and policies, both those carried out by NGOs, local CSOs and state institutions, better equipped for effective inclusion of different groups, and more cooperative and conflict-sensitive and preventive. Marginalised groups will be better able to define their own priorities and defend themselves; higher level policies will be better informed by local realities.

In achieving learning and capacity building at various levels, we will bring together various stakeholders (local groups, government, NGOs etc.).

Output

Chapter in book

  • S.R. Soeters(2016): Adaptation to Climate Change and Variability in Rural West Africa pp. 103 - 120
  • S.R. Soeters, A Abdulai(2018): The Boomerang Effect pp. 1 - 17

Scientific article

Publications for the general public

Details

Project number

W 07.68.410

Main applicant

Prof. dr. E.B. Zoomers

Affiliated with

Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Geowetenschappen, Departement Sociale Geografie en Planologie

Team members

Th. Ayamga, G. Nachim, Dr. S.R. Soeters, P.O. Twala MSc

Duration

01/01/2014 to 30/09/2018