Rubicon-fellow Bas Hensen helps building a Quantum Harbour City in Sydney

14 March 2019

Research collaboration between the University of New South Wales (UNSW) and the University of Sydney has overcome a fundamental hurdle to building quantum computers in silicon, opening the way to further develop the machines at scale.

The two groups have demonstrated that the state, or value, of a quantum bit (qubit) in silicon can be read out in a way that removes the need to have readout sensors alongside the qubits. The result is published in Nature Nanotechnology. Corresponding author is Dr Bas Hensen – NWO Rubicon-fellow and winner of the 2017 NWO Physics Thesis Award.

From left to right - prof. Andrew Dzurak (UNSW), dr. Bas Hensen (UNSW), Anderson West (UNSW), dr. Alexis Jouan (USYD), professor David Reilly (USYD). Krediet - Nyasha Nyakuengama, UNSWFrom left to right - prof. Andrew Dzurak (UNSW), dr. Bas Hensen (UNSW), Anderson West (UNSW), dr. Alexis Jouan (USYD), professor David Reilly (USYD). Krediet - Nyasha Nyakuengama, UNSW

Bas Hensen joined the University of New South Wales from the Netherlands, where he had already made a name for himself by experimentally demonstrating a fundamental principle of quantum mechanics using entangled qubits in diamond. He said: “I was keen to get involved with qubits in silicon and UNSW was clearly the place to be for that.”

Bas Hensen received a Rubicon grant in 2017 for his research on Long Range Entanglement in a Silicon Quantum-processor. In 2018 he received the NWO Physics Thesis Award with his doctoral thesis, Quantum Nonlocality with Spins in Diamond.

Read the publication in Nature Nanotechnology.

Read the full press release here (English only).

Source: NWO