Three projects begin in the Scientific infrastructure for astronomy, computer science, and mathematics programme

12 November 2018

The Exact and Natural Sciences (ENW) domain board has awarded grants to three projects in the Scientific infrastructure for astronomy, computer science and mathematics programme. These grants are intended for investments in innovative scientific instrumentation and in infrastructure of national and international importance.

Applications can be submitted for grants of between 110,000 and 500,000 euros for each project. Grants of a total of 1.1 million euros have been awarded to the three projects. The round that has now been completed is the last in this programme. From now on, researchers seeking grants for medium-sized investments should submit their applications to the new Open Competition ENW.

DAS-6: an ecosystem for Computer Science research
Professor H.E. Bal, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Computer Science
The computer infrastructure for data processing is changing at a pace such that computer scientists need their own system to experiment with the wide range of new hardware. Computer scientists involved in more than 65 projects are using DAS-6 in their research into subjects including computer security, artificial intelligence and data processing generated by scientific instruments, and the Internet-of-Things.

BlackCloud: cloud computing for detection of sources of gravitational waves
Dr S.L.D. Bloemen, Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP
The BlackGEM project, led by Radboud University Nijmegen, is an innovative project in which a number of 65 cm. telescopes with a wide field of view erected at the La Silla Observatory, in Chile, will identify the optical afterglows of gravitational waves. The project grant offers a unique opportunity to use cloud computing to process and store the enormous quantity of data from the telescopes - 1 petabyte - and to make the data available to others.

Extremely Large Telescope to receive an atmospheric correction module
Professor E. Tolstoy, University of Groningen, Kapteyn Astronomical Institute
The European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) is under construction in Chile. Astronomic observations require a correction of rainbow effects caused by the atmosphere, a correction that needs to be made with unparalleled precision. The correction module, developed by the Netherlands, is based on an innovative combination of software and high-tech opto-mechatronics in a cryogenic environment.

Professor Tolstoy's project is constructing a prototype (right) of the module that will enable the E-ELT currently under construction to obtain very sharp images of celestial objects with unparalleled detail. These images provide for extremely precise studies of celestial areas including those with a very high density of stars, such as at the centre of our Milky Way (left, ESO/S. Gillessen)Professor Tolstoy's project is constructing a prototype (right) of the module that will enable the E-ELT currently under construction to obtain very sharp images of celestial objects with unparalleled detail. These images provide for extremely precise studies of celestial areas including those with a very high density of stars, such as at the centre of our Milky Way (left, ESO/S. Gillessen)

Source: NWO

Details

Science area

Exact and Natural Sciences

Programme

Open Competition Domain Science (ENW)

Objective

Large research facilities (2015-2018)