Onderzoek 2019-1

Value and reward. How do we measure science?

Onderzoek 2019-1 | This issue includes: NWO survey on valuing scientists - Ghent University aims for greater academic freedom - A collection of superstars does not make a top university - Don’t underestimate the goodwill factor - Pressure far too high for young scientists - Interview with Elsje van Bergen - The rail doctors - Tug of war around gravity - Capturing neutrinos - Noticed by Wim van Saarloos

Researchers: ‘Consider more than just scientific quality'

 

Credits: Van Santen & Bolleurs

NWO asked almost 2000 researchers at Dutch knowledge institutions in a survey on their preferred assessment criteria.


Ghent University aims for greater academic freedom

Credits: Van Santen & Bolleurs

An eye for quality and trust, less paperwork … last year, Ghent University implemented a radical change in its assessment policy for researchers.


A collection of superstars does not make a top university

Credits: Van Santen & Bolleurs

Science can improve in terms of quality and become even fairer if scientists are assessed on the basis of the content and societal impact of their work.


Don’t underestimate the goodwill factor

Credits: Van Santen & Bolleurs

Two professors reveal which workaround they have found to help young researchers advance in the extremely competitive world of research.


Pressure far too high for young scientists

Credits: Van Santen & Bolleurs

Jeroen Geurts  calls for fewer science divas and more team science.


‘Be smart, creative and determined because disappointment is part of the game’

Credits: Willeke Duijvekam

What do you do at a low point in your career, if your self-confidence has taken a knock and your future dream to be a researcher seems to be out of reach?


The rail doctors

spoor

ProRail, Delft University of Technology and NWO consolidated their knowledge to make the rail network as resilient as possible to future disruptions.


Tug of war around gravity

Credits: Willeke Duijvekam

In the summer of 2009, theoretical physicist Erik Verlinde had a brainwave that developed into a radical new idea about gravity and the universe as an ocean of information. Ten years later, the last word about this has not yet been said.­


Capturing neutrinos

neutrino's

In the Mediterranean Sea, a network of glass spheres is being laid that will detect invisible neutrinos.


NWO magazine on science

Onderzoek is NWO's new magazine and the successor to Hypothese. NWO develops science policy in dialogue with the field and we want to show that. In this magazine we discuss the developments, wishes and other voices in the scientific field. Onderzoek is sent free of charge to researchers, policymakers, journalists and other relations of NWO.