ACOS | Keynote speakers

Keynote speakers 2019

We are proud to announce our expert keynote speakers:
Alexander Balatsky - NORDITA / Stockholm University
Marjolein Dijkstra - Debye Insitute Utrecht University
Wilco Hazeleger - Utrecht University Geosciences
Wilfred van der Wiel - University of Twente

Alexander Balatsky

Alexander Balatsky

Professor Alexander Balatsky's field of research is theoretical condensed matter physics with interests in quantum and Dirac materials. He obtained a MSc in Physics from the Moscow Physical Technical Institute and a PhD on “Intrinsic Orbital Momentum in Superfluid He3” from the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics in Moscow. He pursued postdoc positions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Unversity of Illinois (UIUC). He acted in several positions at LANL, such as a team leader. After working with D. Pines and E. Fradkin at UIUC he joined Los Alamos as the Oppenheimer fellow where he was the founding director of the Institute for Materials Science (IMS) since 2014. From 2012, he is professor in Theoretical Condensed Matter at Nordita – Stockholm University. Alexander published over 360 peer reviewed articles. His recent work has mainly been in strongly correlated materials, unconventional superconductivity and biomolecular electronics. His interests now evolved to using Machine Learning (ML) tools to search for new functional quantum materials.

Abstract
Machine learning in quantum realm: hype vs reality
In this talk he will discuss the use of machine learning to search and predict novel materials with applications ranging from Dirac Materials to search of quantum materials for Dark Matter detection.

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Marjolein Dijkstra

Marjolein Dijkstra

Marjolein Dijkstra (1967) is a Dutch professor in condensed matter physics. She works as a professor in the Debye Institute for NanoMaterials Science at Utrecht University, and the Soft Condensed Matter group of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Utrecht. She earned two master's degrees, one in chemical engineering in 1990 from Wageningen University under the supervision of Yehudi K. Levine and Tjeerd Schaafsma, and another in experimental physics in 1990 from Utrecht University under the supervision of Daan Frenkel. She completed her Ph.D. in 1994, with Frenkel as her doctoral advisor. Her dissertation was ‘The effect of entropy on the structure and stability of complex fluids’. After postdoctoral research at the University of Oxford with Paul Madden and Jean-Pierre Hansen, at the Shell Research and Technology Centre Amsterdam, and at Bristol University with Michael P. Allen and Robert Evans, she joined the Utrecht faculty in 1999. She has been a full professor there since 2007 and was named director of the Debye Institute in 2015.

Abstract
Machine learning and Inverse design of soft materials
Predicting the emergent properties of a material from a microscopic description is a scientific challenge. Machine learning and reverse-engineering have opened new paradigms in the understanding and design of materials. However, the soft-matter field has lagged far behind in embracing this approach for materials design. The difficulty stems from the importance of entropy, ubiquity of multi-scale and many-body interactions, and the prevalence of non-equilibrium and active matter. The abundance of soft-matter phases with orientation and positional order as in liquid crystals, quasicrystals, and plastic crystals, makes the classification non-trivial. The classification of phases is further complicated by the thermal noise. I will address questions like: Can we use machine learning to detect phase transitions, classify phases and find the corresponding order parameters in soft-matter systems? Can we use machine learning to coarse-grain our models? How do we invert the design problem?

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Wilco Hazeleger

Wilco Hazeleger

Wilco Hazeleger (1971) studied meteorology at Wageningen University and Reading University and obtained his PhD in 1999 in physical oceanography from Utrecht University. After his PhD he worked at the Columbia University in New York and at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) on climate dynamics, climate scenarios and the development of global Earth system models. He was also professor in Climate Dynamics at Wageningen University. Wilco has (co)-authored over 100 refereed publications. He served as Director of the Netherlands eScience Center from 2014 until mid-2019 and is actively involved in the open science developments in the Netherlands. As of July 2019 he is Dean of the Faculty of Geosciences and Professor of Climate System Science at Utrecht University.

Abstract
A (c)loud revolution in weather and climate research
Advances in weather forecasting and climate research always went hand in hand with development of high performance computing. In the current era of data-driven research, with data omnipresent from disparate sources, from satellites to smart watches, and new digital technologies, the research domain is changing quickly to develop better and more relevant forecasts and future projections.

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Wilfred van der Wiel

Wilfred van der Wiel

Wilfred van der Wiel’s research focuses on unconventional electronic devices for computing and sensing. He obtained his M.Sc. degree in Applied Physics (cum laude) from Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands in 1997. He did his Ph.D. research on electron transport in quantum dots and electron interferometers both at Delft University of Technology and NTT Basic Research Laboratories in Japan. He obtained his Ph.D. degree (cum laude) in 2002. After that he joined the University of Tokyo as a postdoc and in the same year he was appointed Pioneer (Sakigake) Fellow of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). In 2005 he moved to the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente in The Netherlands, where he took the position of Program Leader of the interdisciplinary nanoelectronics program. Presently he is full professor, holding the Chair NanoElectroncis. In 2006 he was awarded the VIDI grant of the Dutch National Science Foundation (NWO). He was a member of the Young Academy of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) from 2006 till 2012, and a member of the Global Young Academy (GYA) from 2012 till 2017, where he served two years in the Executive Committee. He has led the bottom-up nanoelectronics research section within the Dutch nanotechnology network NanoNed. He received a Starting Grant of the European Research Council (ERC) in 2009, and two ERC Proof of Concept Grants in 2014 and 2015. He is the director of the BRAINS Center for Brain-Inspired Nano Systems. Van der Wiel is author of over 110 peer-reviewed journal articles, receiving over 6,300 citations.

Abstract
Evolving functionality in disordered nanosystems
We show that nanoscale, disordered networks can be configured into efficient, functional devices using the principle of Darwinian evolution. We demonstrate benchmark classification tasks, including reconfigurable Boolean logic and handwritten digit recognition.