Vici Awards 2014


Sorted by NWO division

Alphabetical list 

Darwinian agriculture: guided by an ancient farming mutualism
Dr D.K. (Duur) Aanen (m), Wageningen University - Genetics
How a farmer can maximise the total yield of his crops or cattle is not a trivial question. For example, per individual tree, high apple trees produce more apples than low apple trees but per hectare, low apple trees produce the most apples. I will investigate this question using the millions-of-years-old agricultural symbiosis between fungi and termites.

Living legacies: Influence of plant-mediated changes in soil communities on aboveground plant-insect interactions
Dr T.M. (Martijn) Bezemer (m), Netherlands Institute of Ecology– Ecology
Plants exert a considerable influence on soil life. Changes in the soil life caused by a plant can continue to persist even if the plant disappears. It will be investigated how such legacies of plants in the soil can influence other plants and insects and how these soil effects can be deployed to restore ecosystems.

Cracking the molecular underpinnings of sudden cardiac arrest
Prof. C.R. (Connie) Bezzina (f), AMC Amsterdam – Pathology
Acute heart failure as a result of cardiac arrhythmias is an important cause of death in Western countries. The risk of acute heart failure is largely determined by genetic factors. This project aims to unravel the complexity of the genetic basis for acute heart failure so that strategies for diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment can be developed.

Lost in Translation - Found in Meaning
Prof. J. (Johan) Bos (m), University of Groningen - Computational Linguistics and Philology
Translating well is a difficult task. The meaning must be conveyed as well as possible but a literal translation often results in unnatural constructions. Sometimes a subtle change in meaning can yield a nicer translation. Computer linguists will investigate exactly how that works by automatically analysing large collections of translated texts.

Synthetic Supramolecular Signalling Systems
Prof. L. (Lucas) Brunsveld (m), Eindhoven University of Technology - Organic Chemistry
Producing cell components by combining synthetic materials and biomolecules provides insights into the molecular complexity of life and increases the functionality of the biology as a result of which new applications, for example in molecular diagnostics, will be within reach.

The cost of cognitive doping: From dopamine to cognitive control via dynamic neural coding
Prof. R. (Roshan) Cools (f), Radboud University Medical Centre – Psychonomics and Cognitive Psychology
Our society is in the business of 'human enhancement’. For example, we can see an increase in the use of dopamine-elevating drugs such as Ritalin, also by healthy people. The consequences of this are not clear. This project will investigate the risks and benefits of dopamine for the brain functions that are important for optimal performance and creative thinking.

The neural signature of self-concept development in adolescence
Prof. E.A.M. (Eveline) Crone (f), Leiden University - Developmental psychology
Adolescents have a changing self-image and are therefore extra sensitive to other people's opinions. This can sometimes hinder their development as citizens. New insights from brain research have shown that different aspects of the self-image can be identified in the brain. We will investigate how these areas of the brain develop in adolescents.

Economies of Destruction. The emergence of metalwork deposition during the Bronze Age in Northwest Europe, c. 2300-1500 BC.
Dr D.R. (David) Fontijn (m), Leiden University - Archaeology and Prehistory
In prehistoric times objects of considerable value were destroyed on a large scale and buried in the landscape. Archaeologists will investigate why people did this and how a whole 'economy of destruction' arose in North-West Europe between 2300 and 1500 BC.

The Genealogy of Novelty: An evolutionary explanation of breakthrough inventions in science, technology, and the arts
Prof. K. (Koen) Frenken (m), Utrecht University - Geography
This project will investigate breakthroughs in science, technology and the arts. The central question is whether people whose lived are influenced by very different persons are also the most creative. This will be tested using databases of scientific publications, patents, new companies, technical artefacts, and professional careers.

The Dynamics of Inclusive Finance in the Netherlands, 1750-1970
Prof. O.C. (Oscar) Gelderblom (m), in Utrecht University - Social and Economic History
Societies are better off if companies can pay, lend, save and insure against low costs. That is less easy than it may seem. We will investigate the financing behaviour of Dutch SMEs since 1750 to determine how banks, governments and entrepreneurs have contributed to this themselves.

Galactic Archaeology in the Gaia era: Discovery and characterization of fossil records to uncover the history and distribution of mass of the Milky Way
Prof. A. (Amina) Helmi (f), University of Groningen - Astronomy, astrophysics
Thanks to the recently launched European Gaia satellite we can over the coming five years unravel the history of how the Milky Way evolved. Gaia will enable us to find the remains of the building blocks of our galaxy so that we can reconstruct how this was formed and determine the mass distribution in detail.

When disasters meet conflict. Disaster response of humanitarian aid and local state and non-state institutions in different conflict scenarios.
Prof. D.J.M. (Dorothea) Hilhorst (f), University of Groningen - Development Studies
Natural disasters and conflicts. What happens if a natural disaster occurs in a conflict area? What does the government do, how do institutions function and how do various relief organisations deal with this? How can they prevent the conflict from worsening? This will be investigated in nine countries that are dealing with natural disasters and different types of conflict.

BioAqua: Water as cosubstrate for biocatalytic redox reactions
Dr F. (Frank) Hollmann (m), Delft University of Technology – Catalysis
One of the greatest challenges of the 21st century for chemical sciences is transforming our current chemical industry into a sustainable industry. Through BioAqua, light and water will be used as a source of chemical reactions instead of valuable raw materials.

Towards solving MYOPia: from genes to PATHways using an integrated approach. MYOP-PATH
Prof. C.C.W. (Caroline) Klaver (f), Erasmus MC - Medicine: Organs and organ systems
Shortsightedness that requires glasses with strong lenses is becoming increasingly common and causes blindness. The condition is caused by many small errors in networks of genes that are mainly expressed in a suitable environment. The scientists will investigate how the genes and the environment jointly result in shortsightedness and how this can be prevented.

Hybrid nanophotonic architectures for ultrafast quantum optics
Prof. A. F. (Femius) Koenderink (m), FOM/AMOLF - Nanophysics/technology
That a single molecule can emit, absorb or deflect a single particle of light lies at the basis of how we observe and illuminate our world and how we send each other classically-encrypted or quantum-encrypted information. A cross-fertilisation of miniature palaces of mirrors and nanoscale radio antennae must make information processing with packages of single photons ultrarapid, ultra-efficient and ultra-broadband.

Flexible robotic suit
Prof. H. (Herman) van der Kooij (m), University of Twente - Mechanical Engineering
We are one of the groups that has developed wearable exoskeletons to allow people who cannot walk independently to walk again. However, these are relatively heavy, cumbersome, large and not user-friendly. It is time for the next step: the supple robot suit that you can put on like a pair of trousers and that supports paralysed people during walking.

Understanding membrane fusion at the molecular level using a biomimetic model system
Dr A. (Alexander) Kros (m), Leiden University - Chemistry
For living cells the transport of molecules is vitally important but also highly complex. Based on a biomimetic model system that we have developed the controlled transport of incoming and outgoing molecules will be studied at the molecular level. One possible application of this knowledge is the release of medicines at the right location.

Controlling the controller: Regulation of signals that guide stem and cancer cell growth and differentiation
Dr M.M. (Madelon) Maurice (f), University Medical Center Utrecht – Biochemistry
The ability of stem cells to rejuvenate and repair tissues is accurately regulated by signals from the environment. These signals are often ‘abused’ by cancer cells during tumour growth. The researchers want to understand how stem cells pick up and process these signals so that they can better intervene in these processes in tissue repair and cancer.

A healthy skin: the importance of immune control
Prof. L. (Linde) Meyaard (f), University Medical Center Utrecht –Immunology
A healthy skin does not respond to harmless bacteria. The researcher has discovered a new protein that moderates hypersensitive immune reactions to bacteria. People without the protein have an increased chance of developing eczema. The question is how this protein keeps the skin quiet and how eczema can be prevented.

Tomography of the Quark-Gluon Plasma - beauty quarks as a key probe
Dr A. (André) Mischke (m), Utrecht University - Subatomic Physics
The young, evolving universe found itself in a quark-gluon plasma state just after the Big Bang. This research project will focus on studying the dynamic properties of this fundamental matter, which also arises momentarily if atomic nuclei in the laboratory collide with each other at very high energy levels.

Information-driven optical imaging in turbid materials
Prof. A.P. (Allard) Mosk (m), University of Twente - Condensed Matter and Optical Physics
Light can be formed in such a way that it answers a question about an object: “Is it is elongated or round, smooth or prickly?” Even if objects are hidden deep in a deflecting or absorbing material we can still expose relevant properties.

Giving cognition a hand: Linking spatial cognition to linguistic expression in native and late learners of sign language and bimodal bilinguals
Prof. H.A. (Asli) Özyürek (f), Radboud University Nijmegen CLS – Linguistics
Thinking and speaking about space are basic elements for our everyday communication. In sign languages, unlike in spoken languages, space is coded in icons by the visual articulators. This project will investigate whether this aspect of sign language influences the spatial cognition of sign language users in a different way than that of spoken language users.

Guiding the guides of nervous system wiring
Prof. R.J. (Jeroen) Pasterkamp (m), University Medical Center Utrecht - Histology, Cell Biology
Our brains contain 100 billion nerve cells, each of which makes about one thousand connections. These connections are made during the embryonic development according to a 'road map' made up of a code of proteins. This project investigates how about one hundred such proteins form a map that regulates the construction of billions of nerve fibre connections.

How do galaxies regulate their growth?
Prof. J. (Joop) Schaye (m), Leiden University - Astronomy, astrophysics
Galaxies grow when gas is drawn in from their environment. They probably regulate their growth via young stars and black holes that blast much of the gas back into the intergalactic space via enormous shock waves. We will study these poorly understood processes using both observations and computer simulations.

From the Never-Ending Atom Laser to the Ultimate Clock
Prof. F. (Florian) Schreck (m), University of Amsterdam - Condensed Matter and Optical Physics
Atoms are not only particles but also waves. The researchers will use this property to build a never-ending atom laser. They will then use this laser to build the ultimate clock: an optical laser with an unprecedented stability.

Molecular plasticity of good and bad memories
Dr S. (Sabine) Spijker (f), VU University Amsterdam - Medicine
Memories give us our identity but after reliving it, a memory is no longer the same as it was before, due to a change of communication between brain cells. The researchers will systematically analyse this changing communication that follows the retrieval of memories by comparing different types of memory (good and bad) with each other.

DNA damage and plant immunity; an ancient link, a novel paradigm. Elucidating the activity of NLR-type immune receptors in the plant nucleus.
Dr F.L.W. (Frank) Takken (m), University of Amsterdam - Life sciences
Plants are the most important source of food for people and animals. Despite the advanced immune system of plants more than 35% of the potential worldwide yield is lost to diseases. Researchers want to understand how plants activate their defences if they detect pathogens. Using this knowledge they will be able to protect plants better against pathogens.

Cellular change management: how cells adapt to dynamic and uncertain conditions
Prof. B. (Bas) Teusink (m), VU University Amsterdam – Life Sciences
Cells often have to deal with suddenly changing conditions. Furthermore, the number of components in a cell, such as proteins or RNA molecules, can randomly differ slightly per cell. In this project the regulatory systems of metabolism in yeast that lead to robust adaptations in such an uncertain world will be studied.

Global Value Chains: a perspective on worldwide trade, jobs and income inequality
Prof. M.P. (Marcel) Timmer (m), University of Groningen - Macroeconomics
An iPad is developed in the United States but produced in China. Who does what, where and for which recompense? This project will investigate the determinants of trade and provide new insights into the consequences for jobs and incomes of employees at a regional, national and global level.

Quantum simulation on a chip
Prof. L.M.K. (Lieven) Vandersypen (m), Delft University of Technology - Nanophysics/technology
Materials and molecules rapidly become too complex to calculate on computers. The researchers will therefore simulate and measure complex materials and molecules in the lab using nanotechnology. They hope to gain new insights that can lead to better medicines and cleaner technology.

Anti-bullying programs 2.0: Tailored interventions to minimize bullying
Prof. D.R. (René) Veenstra (m), University Groningen - Sociology
Why do anti-bullying measures fail to work in some classes? Using social network analyses and tailored advice an effort will be made to solve the problem of bullying. Interventions (meaningful tasks for popular bullies; support groups for chronic victims of bullying; coaching of teachers) will be developed, implemented and evaluated to help schools in their battle against bullying.

Causes and consequences of de novo mutations in intellectual disability and male infertility
Prof. J.A. (Joris) Veltman (m), Radboud University Medical Centre - Genetics
In this project researchers will study the role of spontaneous mutations in the development of both learning disabilities and male infertility. For this the entire genetic material of children and their parents will be examined. In addition they will investigate whether the number of mutations increases in children of older fathers and/or due to artificial insemination.

The biochemical and evolutionary basis of specificity in plant hormone responses
Prof. D. (Dolf) Weijers (m), Wageningen University - Plant Science
The hormone auxin controls a large number of different growth processes and therefore plays a vital role in the development of plants. By studying the structure, approach and evolution of a family of gene switches, the researchers will try to determine how this multifunctionality works and how it arose.

Between institutions and social mechanisms: education and inequality in comparative perspective
Prof. H.G. (Herman) van de Werfhorst (m), University of Amsterdam – Sociology
The design of an education system is related to the educational performances of students and inequalities in the education. Research that compares countries pays too little attention to the micro-mechanisms that explain how the system characteristics are associated with these outcomes. I will investigate how education system characteristics can enhance or weaken microprocesses in families and schools and how these system characteristics have evolved and are being legitimised.

EXPERT: EXploiting non-coding RNA Pathways for novel diagnostics and thERapeuTics in heart failure
Prof. L.J. (Leon) de Windt (m), Maastricht University – Physiology
Chronic heart failure is rapidly becoming more prevalent. It is a condition of the heart muscle which results in the loss of blood flow in all organs. Based on findings in one form of heart failure the researchers will first determine the cause-effect relationship of molecules that cause heart diseases and then rationally design new classes of medicines against these.

Rare Events: Asymptotics, Algorithms, Applications
Prof. A.P. (Bert) Zwart (m), CWI - Stochastics
Rare events such as a financial crisis, a flood, or the destruction of an electricity network can have an enormous impact on our society. This research will develop mathematical techniques that provide insights into the development and frequency as well as the prevention and mitigation of this type of event so that we can better shield ourselves from the effects of these.

Top 

Laureates Earth and Life Sciences (ALW)

Darwinian agriculture: guided by an ancient farming mutualism
Dr D.K. (Duur) Aanen (m), Wageningen University - Genetics
How a farmer can maximise the total yield of his crops or cattle is not a trivial question. For example, per individual tree, high apple trees produce more apples than low apple trees but per hectare, low apple trees produce the most apples. I will investigate this question using the millions-of-years-old agricultural symbiosis between fungi and termites.

Living legacies: Influence of plant-mediated changes in soil communities on aboveground plant-insect interactions
Dr T.M. (Martijn) Bezemer (m), Netherlands Institute of Ecology– Ecology
Plants exert a considerable influence on soil life. Changes in the soil life caused by a plant can continue to persist even if the plant disappears. It will be investigated how such legacies of plants in the soil can influence other plants and insects and how these soil effects can be deployed to restore ecosystems.

Guiding the guides of nervous system wiring
Prof. R.J. (Jeroen) Pasterkamp (m), University Medical Center Utrecht - Histology, Cell Biology
Our brains contain 100 billion nerve cells, each of which makes about one thousand connections. These connections are made during the embryonic development according to a 'road map' made up of a code of proteins. This project investigates how about one hundred such proteins form a map that regulates the construction of billions of nerve fibre connections.

A prison for the mind: Limiting neuronal plasticity involving the extracellular matrix
Dr S. (Sabine) Spijker (f), VU University Amsterdam - Medicine
Adaptation and plasticity of the brain is vital for adequate learning and adjustments in emotional processes. The researchers will study a new mechanism that encapsulates brain cells so that they are no longer capable of responding to stimuli in the environment. This results in emotional and memory problems.

DNA damage and plant immunity; an ancient link, a novel paradigm. Elucidating the activity of NLR-type immune receptors in the plant nucleus.
Dr F.L.W. (Frank) Takken (m), University of Amsterdam - Life sciences
Plants are the most important source of food for people and animals. Despite the advanced immune system of plants more than 35% of the potential worldwide yield is lost to diseases. Researchers want to understand how plants activate their defences if they detect pathogens. Using this knowledge they will be able to protect plants better against pathogens.

Cellular change management: how cells adapt to dynamic and uncertain conditions
Prof. B. (Bas) Teusink (m), VU University Amsterdam – Life Sciences
Cells often have to deal with suddenly changing conditions. Furthermore, the number of components in a cell, such as proteins or RNA molecules, can randomly differ slightly per cell. In this project the regulatory systems of metabolism in yeast that lead to robust adaptations in such an uncertain world will be studied.

The biochemical and evolutionary basis of specificity in plant hormone responses
Prof. D. (Dolf) Weijers (m), Wageningen University - Plant Science
The hormone auxin controls a large number of different growth processes and therefore plays a vital role in the development of plants. By studying the structure, approach and evolution of a family of gene switches, the researchers will try to determine how this multifunctionality works and how it arose.

Top

Laureates Chemical Sciences (CW)

Synthetic Supramolecular Signalling Systems
Prof. L. (Lucas) Brunsveld (m), Eindhoven University of Technology - Organic Chemistry
Producing cell components by combining synthetic materials and biomolecules provides insights into the molecular complexity of life and increases the functionality of the biology as a result of which new applications, for example in molecular diagnostics, will be within reach.

BioAqua: Water as cosubstrate for biocatalytic redox reactions
Dr F. (Frank) Hollmann (m), Delft University of Technology – Catalysis
One of the greatest challenges of the 21st century for chemical sciences is transforming our current chemical industry into a sustainable industry. Through BioAqua, light and water will be used as a source of chemical reactions instead of valuable raw materials. 

Understanding membrane fusion at the molecular level using a biomimetic model system
Dr A. (Alexander) Kros (m), Leiden University - Chemistry
For living cells the transport of molecules is vitally important but also highly complex. Based on a biomimetic model system that we have developed the controlled transport of incoming and outgoing molecules will be studied at the molecular level. One possible application of this knowledge is the release of medicines at the right location.

Top 

Laureates Physical Sciences (EW)

Galactic Archaeology in the Gaia era: Discovery and characterization of fossil records to uncover the history and distribution of mass of the Milky Way
Prof. A. (Amina) Helmi (f), University of Groningen - Astronomy, astrophysics
Thanks to the recently launched European Gaia satellite we can over the coming five years unravel the history of how the Milky Way evolved. Gaia will enable us to find the remains of the building blocks of our galaxy so that we can reconstruct how this was formed and determine the mass distribution in detail.

How do galaxies regulate their growth?
Prof. J. (Joop) Schaye (m), Leiden University - Astronomy, astrophysics
Galaxies grow when gas is drawn in from their environment. They probably regulate their growth via young stars and black holes that blast much of the gas back into the intergalactic space via enormous shock waves. We will study these poorly understood processes using both observations and computer simulations.

Rare Events: Asymptotics, Algorithms, Applications
Prof. A.P. (Bert) Zwart (m), CWI - Stochastics
Rare events such as a financial crisis, a flood, or the destruction of an electricity network can have an enormous impact on our society. This research will develop mathematical techniques that provide insights into the development and frequency as well as the prevention and mitigation of this type of event so that we can better shield ourselves from the effects of these.

Top 

Laureates Humanities (GW)

Lost in Translation - Found in Meaning
Prof. J. (Johan) Bos (m), University of Groningen - Computational Linguistics and Philology
Translating well is a difficult task. The meaning must be conveyed as well as possible but a literal translation often results in unnatural constructions. Sometimes a subtle change in meaning can yield a nicer translation. Computer linguists will investigate exactly how that works by automatically analysing large collections of translated texts.

Economies of Destruction. The emergence of metalwork deposition during the Bronze Age in Northwest Europe, c. 2300-1500 BC.
Dr D.R. (David) Fontijn (m), Leiden University - Archaeology and Prehistory
In prehistoric times objects of considerable value were destroyed on a large scale and buried in the landscape. Archaeologists will investigate why people did this and how a whole 'economy of destruction' arose in North-West Europe between 2300 and 1500 BC. 

The Dynamics of Inclusive Finance in the Netherlands, 1750-1970
Prof. O.C. (Oscar) Gelderblom (m), in Utrecht University - Social and Economic History
Societies are better off if companies can pay, lend, save and insure against low costs. That is less easy than it may seem. We will investigate the financing behaviour of Dutch SMEs since 1750 to determine how banks, governments and entrepreneurs have contributed to this themselves.

Giving cognition a hand: Linking spatial cognition to linguistic expression in native and late learners of sign language and bimodal bilinguals
Prof. H.A. (Asli) Özyürek (f), Radboud University Nijmegen CLS – Linguistics
Thinking and speaking about space are basic elements for our everyday communication. In sign languages, unlike in spoken languages, space is coded in icons by the visual articulators. This project will investigate whether this aspect of sign language influences the spatial cognition of sign language users in a different way than that of spoken language users. 

Top 

Laureates Social Sciences (MaGW)

The cost of cognitive doping: From dopamine to cognitive control via dynamic neural coding
Prof. R. (Roshan) Cools (f), Radboud University Medical Centre – Psychonomics and Cognitive Psychology
Our society is in the business of 'human enhancement’. For example, we can see an increase in the use of dopamine-elevating drugs such as Ritalin, also by healthy people. The consequences of this are not clear. This project will investigate the risks and benefits of dopamine for the brain functions that are important for optimal performance and creative thinking.

The neural signature of self-concept development in adolescence
Prof. E.A.M. (Eveline) Crone (f), Leiden University - Developmental psychology
Adolescents have a changing self-image and are therefore extra sensitive to other people's opinions. This can sometimes hinder their development as citizens. New insights from brain research have shown that different aspects of the self-image can be identified in the brain. We will investigate how these areas of the brain develop in adolescents.

The Genealogy of Novelty: An evolutionary explanation of breakthrough inventions in science, technology, and the arts
Prof. K. (Koen) Frenken (m), Utrecht University - Geography
This project will investigate breakthroughs in science, technology and the arts. The central question is whether people whose lived are influenced by very different persons are also the most creative. This will be tested using databases of scientific publications, patents, new companies, technical artefacts, and professional careers.

When disasters meet conflict. Disaster response of humanitarian aid and local state and non-state institutions in different conflict scenarios.
Prof. D.J.M. (Dorothea) Hilhorst (f), University of Groningen - Development Studies
Natural disasters and conflicts. What happens if a natural disaster occurs in a conflict area? What does the government do, how do institutions function and how do various relief organisations deal with this? How can they prevent the conflict from worsening? This will be investigated in nine countries that are dealing with natural disasters and different types of conflict. 

Global Value Chains: a perspective on worldwide trade, jobs and income inequality
Prof. M.P. (Marcel) Timmer (m), University of Groningen - Macroeconomics
An iPad is developed in the United States but produced in China. Who does what, where and for which recompense? This project will investigate the determinants of trade and provide new insights into the consequences for jobs and incomes of employees at a regional, national and global level.

Anti-bullying programs 2.0: Tailored interventions to minimize bullying
Prof. D.R. (René) Veenstra (m), University Groningen - Sociology
Why do anti-bullying measures fail to work in some classes? Using social network analyses and tailored advice an effort will be made to solve the problem of bullying. Interventions (meaningful tasks for popular bullies; support groups for chronic victims of bullying; coaching of teachers) will be developed, implemented and evaluated to help schools in their battle against bullying. 

Between institutions and social mechanisms: education and inequality in comparative perspective
Prof. H.G. (Herman) van de Werfhorst (m), University of Amsterdam – Sociology
The design of an education system is related to the educational performances of students and inequalities in the education. Research that compares countries pays too little attention to the micro-mechanisms that explain how the system characteristics are associated with these outcomes. I will investigate how education system characteristics can enhance or weaken microprocesses in families and schools and how these system characteristics have evolved and are being legitimised.

Top 

Laureates Physics (N)

Hybrid nanophotonic architectures for ultrafast quantum optics
Prof. A. F. (Femius) Koenderink (m), FOM/AMOLF - Nanophysics/technology
That a single molecule can emit, absorb or deflect a single particle of light lies at the basis of how we observe and illuminate our world and how we send each other classically-encrypted or quantum-encrypted information. A cross-fertilisation of miniature palaces of mirrors and nanoscale radio antennae must make information processing with packages of single photons ultrarapid, ultra-efficient and ultra-broadband.

Tomography of the Quark-Gluon Plasma - beauty quarks as a key probe
Dr A. (André) Mischke (m), Utrecht University - Subatomic Physics
The young, evolving universe found itself in a quark-gluon plasma state just after the Big Bang. This research project will focus on studying the dynamic properties of this fundamental matter, which also arises momentarily if atomic nuclei in the laboratory collide with each other at very high energy levels. 

Information-driven optical imaging in turbid materials
Prof. A.P. (Allard) Mosk (m), University of Twente - Condensed Matter and Optical Physics
Light can be formed in such a way that it answers a question about an object: “Is it is elongated or round, smooth or prickly?” Even if objects are hidden deep in a deflecting or absorbing material we can still expose relevant properties.

From the Never-Ending Atom Laser to the Ultimate Clock
Prof. F. (Florian) Schreck (m), University of Amsterdam - Condensed Matter and Optical Physics
Atoms are not only particles but also waves. The researchers will use this property to build a never-ending atom laser. They will then use this laser to build the ultimate clock: an optical laser with an unprecedented stability. 

Quantum simulation on a chip
Prof. L.M.K. (Lieven) Vandersypen (m), Delft University of Technology - Nanophysics/technology
Materials and molecules rapidly become too complex to calculate on computers. The researchers will therefore simulate and measure complex materials and molecules in the lab using nanotechnology. They hope to gain new insights that can lead to better medicines and cleaner technology.

Top 

Laureates Technology Foundation STW

Flexible robotic suit
Prof. H. (Herman) van der Kooij (m), University of Twente - Mechanical Engineering
We are one of the groups that has developed wearable exoskeletons to allow people who cannot walk independently to walk again. However, these are relatively heavy, cumbersome, large and not user-friendly. It is time for the next step: the supple robot suit that you can put on like a pair of trousers and that supports paralysed people during walking.

Top 

Laureates Netherlands Organsiation for Health Research and Development ZonMw

Cracking the molecular underpinnings of sudden cardiac arrest
Prof. C.R. (Connie) Bezzina (f), AMC Amsterdam – Pathology
Acute heart failure as a result of cardiac arrhythmias is an important cause of death in Western countries. The risk of acute heart failure is largely determined by genetic factors. This project aims to unravel the complexity of the genetic basis for acute heart failure so that strategies for diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment can be developed.

Towards solving MYOPia: from genes to PATHways using an integrated approach. MYOP-PATH
Prof. C.C.W. (Caroline) Klaver (f), Erasmus MC - Medicine: Organs and organ systems
Shortsightedness that requires glasses with strong lenses is becoming increasingly common and causes blindness. The condition is caused by many small errors in networks of genes that are mainly expressed in a suitable environment. The scientists will investigate how the genes and the environment jointly result in shortsightedness and how this can be prevented. 

Controlling the controller: Regulation of signals that guide stem and cancer cell growth and differentiation
Dr M.M. (Madelon) Maurice (f), University Medical Center Utrecht – Biochemistry
The ability of stem cells to rejuvenate and repair tissues is accurately regulated by signals from the environment. These signals are often ‘abused’ by cancer cells during tumour growth. The researchers want to understand how stem cells pick up and process these signals so that they can better intervene in these processes in tissue repair and cancer.

A healthy skin: the importance of immune control
Prof. L. (Linde) Meyaard (f), University Medical Center Utrecht –Immunology
A healthy skin does not respond to harmless bacteria. The researcher has discovered a new protein that moderates hypersensitive immune reactions to bacteria. People without the protein have an increased chance of developing eczema. The question is how this protein keeps the skin quiet and how eczema can be prevented. 

Causes and consequences of de novo mutations in intellectual disability and male infertility
Prof. J.A. (Joris) Veltman (m), Radboud University Medical Centre - Genetics
In this project researchers will study the role of spontaneous mutations in the development of both learning disabilities and male infertility. For this the entire genetic material of children and their parents will be examined. In addition they will investigate whether the number of mutations increases in children of older fathers and/or due to artificial insemination.

EXPERT: EXploiting non-coding RNA Pathways for novel diagnostics and thERapeuTics in heart failure
Prof. L.J. (Leon) de Windt (m), Maastricht University – Physiology
Chronic heart failure is rapidly becoming more prevalent. It is a condition of the heart muscle which results in the loss of blood flow in all organs. Based on findings in one form of heart failure the researchers will first determine the cause-effect relationship of molecules that cause heart diseases and then rationally design new classes of medicines against these.

Top