Veni awards 2015

A list of the 161 Veni laureates, working titles and a brief summaries of the research projects is given below. The laureates are also listed per NWO division. Veni, along with Vidi and Vici is a part of NWO's Talent Scheme programme.


Fact and figures

Total (eligible) applicants: 1124
Male/female applicant ratio: 504 female, 620 male
Number of awards (percentage): 161 (14%)
Female/male award ratio : 75 women, 86 men
Percentage awarded (women): 15%
Percentage awarded (men): 14%


Alphabetical list by researcher's surname

A

Descartes Put to the Test. Voices of dissent in the Golden Age
Dr H.T. (Han Thomas) Adriaenssen (m), University of Groningen – Philosophy
In the 17th century, Descartes and his followers broke away from the mediaeval worldview. But their attempts to innovate were constantly put to the test by conservative thinkers. This project studies how they formulated challenges for new theories and, by doing this, made an important contribution to philosophical developments in the Golden Age

Energetics of Galaxy Clusters: Toward a new picture of cosmic structure formation history
Dr H. (Hiroki) Akamatsu (m), SRON
My objective is to work at the boundaries of X-ray astronomy. I will do this with astronomical observations made with the Japanese Astro-H satellite and by contributing to the technology that makes a better instrument possible in ESA's Athena satellite.

The time is now: Timing Verification for Safety-Critical Multi-Cores
Dr S.J.A. (Sebastian) Altmeyer (m), University of Amsterdam – Informatics Institute
Safety-critical computer systems embedded into cars or aircraft must work correctly, as a single failure or a wrong timing may have catastrophic consequences and cost lives. The aim of this research is to guarantee the correct timing behaviour of such safety-critical systems for modern processor architectures by devising new mathematical models and tools.

Mapping the Accretion Processes that Form the Universe's Most Rapidly Rotating Stars
Dr A.M. (Anne) Archibald (f), University of Amsterdam - Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy
By transferring matter from an accompanying star, some stars - the so-called “millisecond pulsars" - rotate hundreds of times each second. The details of this process are not understood precisely. Using radiotelescopes, optical telescopes, X-ray telescopes and gamma telescopes, I will search for the origin of such systems.

Behaviour and molecular signature of neural stem cells, and changes occurring during aging
Dr B.A. (Benedetta) Artegiani (f), Hubrecht Institute
Stem cells in the brain produce neurons throughout life. However, distinct subtypes of neural stem cells could contribute differently to this process. I will distinguish those different subtypes, study their behaviour, identify molecules responsible for their specific functions, and investigate how those properties change with aging.

Brain cannabis predisposes (early) vulnerability
Dr P. (Piray) Atsak (f), Radboudumc – Cognitive Neuroscience
Healthy brain development is rooted in the quality of our relationships with early caregivers. Child neglect or child abuse can create vulnerability to psychiatric diseases. I will research how the endogenous cannabis system in the brain is involved in the long-term effects of early neglect on brain function and emotional behaviour.

Cell mechanics for regenerative medicine
Dr B.I. (Bakiye) Avci (f), AMC – Biomedical Engineering & Physics
This project will develop a non-invasive measurement technique based on optical coherence tomography and the principles of vibrography for the evaluation of the quality of egg cells and pre-implantation embryos using acoustic forces. The ultimate objective is to increase the success rate for IVF treatment. 

B

Speech perception driven by context
Dr M. (Martijn) Baart (m), Tilburg University – Linguistics
The context within which we perceive speech helps us to interpret the sounds correctly. This research focuses on the interplay between our lexicon (the storehouse of existing words), our capacity to read lips (the interpretation of the speaker's moving mouth) and semantics (our knowledge of words' meanings) during speech perception.

Transatlantic trade and investment partnership' (TTIP): The de-democratisation of European market regulation?
Dr M. (Marija) Bartl (f), University of Amsterdam - Centre for the Study of European Contract Law
By analysing the TTIP within the context of de-democratisation outside the State, this project will survey the democratic influences of TTIP institutions and offers practical solutions for the minimisation of its negative effects.

Fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria
Dr A. A. (Andreas) Bastian (m) University of Groningen - Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the fact that the development of antibiotics is commercially unattractive form a threat to patients who are infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria. The proposed research focuses on the discovery of medicinal candidates that bypass resistance to carbapenems, the last resort against bacteria.

The surrealistic Middle Ages
Dr T.M. (Tessel) Bauduin (f), Radboud University Nijmegen – Art History and Architecture
Throughout the previous century, the Middle Ages were repeatedly rediscovered, also by surrealists such as Dalí. This project will study how and why the surrealists valued mediaeval art such as that of Hieronymus Bosch, and used it to present themselves as being new and modern.

Unravelling Homer's Language
Dr L.C. (Lucien) van Beek (m), Leiden University – Linguistics
Homer, the oldest Greek poet, composed his epic stories in an artificial language. According to linguists, this language arose as a mixture of many Greek dialects. This project will analyse the provenance of apparent dialect forms using a new model of language evolution and in this way seeks to demonstrate that Homer used only one dialect.

Is the selection behaviour of patients predictable?
Dr E.W. (Esther) de Bekker-Grob (f), Erasmus MC – Public Health
Obtaining insight into patients' preferences is for reaching optimal clinical and policy decisions. This research project will establish how well the preferences patients say they have correspond with what they actually choose, why these deviate, and how selection behaviour can be better predicted.

Determining the mechanisms of TAD formation and their role in transcriptional regulation
Dr J.G. (Joke) van Bemmel (f), Erasmus MC, Reproduction and Development
The turning on and off of genes is affected by interactions with other pieces of DNA. Due to breaks in strands of DNA, such as in cancer cells, a gene ends up in a new environment and has other contacts. The researchers will analyse whether the new environment has an effect on turning that gene on or off.

Why do you read better than I do?
Dr E. (Elsje) van Bergen (f), VU University Amsterdam- Faculty of Psychology and Education
Children differ greatly in how well they read. A behavioural geneticist will unravel the question of which interplay between genes and environment is responsible for this. Is reading ability as simple as: like parent like child? And if so, does this come from the genes that the parents pass on or from the environment that the parents create?

The aetiology and result of affective psychosis caused by childbirth
Dr V. (Veerle) Bergink (f), Erasmus MC - Psychiatry
After giving birth, women run a high risk of mania or psychosis. This project studies what occurs in the brain structure and activity during this period. We then research whether we can predict which women will suffer a manic depressive recurrence and which women will have a favourable progression of the disease.

Rewards: from brain to business
Dr E. (Erik) Bijleveld (m), Radboud University Nijmegen – Behavioural Science Institute
People often get the best out of themselves in places where there is lots to be gained. But not always: sometimes rewards end up yielding poorer performance. This project looks at the influence of rewards on information processing in the cerebral cortex. This will make clearer the conditions under which rewards (do not) improve human performance.

Correspondence between climate and regional changes in sea level
Dr B. (Bas) de Boer (m), Utrecht University – Institute for Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht (IMAU)
Over the next century, the Antarctic ice sheet and the Greenland ice sheet will contribute significantly to the rise in sea level. In this project, I will simultaneously simulate the climate, ice caps and regional sea levels of the late Pliocene era to gain a better understanding of the consequences of a warmer climate.

Get rid of that itch!
Dr E.H.J. (Ellen) van den Bogaard (f), Radboudumc – Dermatology
Eczema patients are distracted by itching every day. Or, better said: it keeps them from a normal daily life. By developing complex 3D models of the skin, the researchers will study whether the cells and molecules involved in itching can be inhibited. With this knowledge, focussed therapies for itching can be developed.

Differences in remuneration among professions
Dr T. (Thijs) Bol (m), University of Amsterdam ‒ Sociology
Wage inequality has increased in recent decades in many Western countries. Research shows that this increase can be explained primarily by an increasing disparity in wages among professions. This project investigates why some professions become increasingly lucrative, while wages in other professions remain the same or decrease.

Do intestinal bacteria increase the risk of intestinal cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis?
Dr J.M. (Annemarie) Boleij (f), Radboudumc - Pathology
Toxic intestinal bacteria possibly increase the risk of colon cancer in patients with infectious intestinal diseases (ulcerative colitis). The researchers will determine whether toxic bacteria can be correlated with intestinal cancer processes in colitis patients with intestinal cancer. The predictive value of these bacteria can be used in the future for the early diagnosis of intestinal cancer

You learn who your friends are when under stress
Dr N.J. (Neeltje) Boogert (f), Wageningen University – Animal Sciences
Animals differ, just as we do, in the number and strength of their social contacts. Can early life experiences predict later network positions? The researcher will expose chicks to competition and food scarcity and will measure how these stress factors affect the birds' later social lives. This research will help explain social animal behaviour.

Stress, steroids and poor vision
Dr C.J.F. (Camiel) Boon (m), Leiden University Medical Center - Ophthalmology
Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is a disease of the eye that occurs relatively frequently and that is associated with the use of corticosteroids and with stress (manager's disease). Little is known about its genesis and treatment possibilities are limited. I will search for genetic factors in CSC, the consequences at the cell level, and for better treatments.

Soft yet safe
Dr B.W. (Bas) Borsje (m), University of Twente – Civil Engineering
Construction using nature is a promising method of coastal protection that contributes to making our coastline climate-proof and facilitates the coastal zone's economic development. This research will study the stability of tidal marshes during storm conditions; this knowledge will help us design soft foreshores.

How the brain solves complicated problems
Dr J.P. (Jelmer) Borst (m), University of Groningen – Artificial Intelligence
In this project, a simulation will be made of how people process complicated problems - problems such as algebra - in their brains. To understand the brain's information processing, the scientists will use two new methods of analysis. Such a simulation can help to train people better in solving these types of problems.

Regulating cannabis factories in psychotic patients
Dr M.G. (Matthijs) Bossong (m), University Medical Center Utrecht – Brain
Our brains contain cannabis factories that play a role in our immune system. In patients with psychosis, these factories do not work well. This research will study how regulating patients' cannabis factories results in better functioning of the immune system and a decrease in psychotic symptoms.

Inequality in education and parents' socio-spatial strategies
Dr W.R. (Willem) Boterman (m), University of Amsterdam - Urban Geography/Urban Studies
Which social and spatial strategies do parents use in order to gain access to good elementary schools? This study investigates the relationship between neighbourhood and school choice in Dutch cities and how this differs among highly educated, less educated, foreign and native parents.

A Novel Supramolecular System for Membrane Fusion and Biosensing
Dr A.L. (Aimee) Boyle (f), Leiden University - Leiden Institute of Chemistry
From simple building blocks, I will design a new supramolecular system that performs two functions. It can help explain membrane fusion - a crucial process in our bodies. It can also be used as a biosensor for detecting contamination in sources of water.

Design for success
Dr L.E.A. (Laura) Braden (f), Erasmus University Rotterdam — Arts and Culture Studies
Interdisciplinary approaches are increasingly emphasised, yet little is known of the effect on workers. This study will examine strategies designers use in integrating different disciplines to craft successful careers. Studying how creative work is accomplished under divergent disciplinary standards aids understanding larger shifting values within modern work.

Modelling decision-making in antisocial and psychopathic offenders
Dr I.A. (Inti) Brazil (m), Radboud University Nijmegen - Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour
There are many violent patients with extremely antisocial personality styles and/or psychopathologies in clinics for those detained under a hospital order. These patients respond poorly to current forms of treatment and continue to make bad choices. In this project, a decision-making model will be used to determine why these patients make poor choices, so that specially adapted methods of treatment can be developed.

The role of expectations in economic models
Dr J. R. (Jochem) de Bresser (m), University of Groningen – Economics, Econometrics and Finance
Expectations about wages, health and life span play a central role in economic models for the supply of labour and the propensity to save. However, economists have approached these expectations to date with their own predictions on the basis of available information. In this research, I will enrich economic models with the actual expectations that people cherish.

Families as the cornerstone of the rotavirus epidemic
Dr P.C.J.L. (Patricia) Bruijning-Verhagen (f), University Medical Center Utrecht
Young children and their families play a central role in spreading the rotavirus, the most important cause of severe gastroenteritis among children. This research will study the spread of the rotavirus among young families and will determine, based on mathematical models, how vaccination can decrease the spread of rotavirus stomach flu.

Tourism in Places of Conflict: A Study of the Emotional Dynamics of Dark Tourism in the Palestinian West Bank
Dr D.M. (Dorina Maria) Buda (f), University of Groningen - Cultural Geography
‘Dark tourism' refers to tourism in areas were conflicts and cruelties take place. In this project, I will investigate how the emotional and affective dynamics between tourists and local stakeholders give shape to the identity of conflict areas. In this, I focus on tourists' experiences in the Palestinian West Bank of the Jordan River. 

C

The Inventory of Large Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks
Dr A. (Alessandra) Candian (f), Leiden University – Leiden Observatory
What are the key ingredients for the evolution of life on planets? Are these ingredients already available in regions where planet will form? I will investigate these questions modelling the life and death of large and smaller carbon-based molecules in space.

Strange? Narrators in Contemporary Fiction: Towards a Cognitive Reception Theory
Dr M. (Marco) Caracciolo (m), University of Groningen – Literary and Cultural Studies
Why do we value novels narrated by a psychopath? This project studies how contemporary readers deal with the “unusualness" of this type of narrator; it identifies a wide range of interpretive strategies the readers use in dealing with the cognitive and ethical distance between themselves and the fictitious characters.

Energy metabolism determines the immune system's direction
Dr S. (Shih-Chin) Cheng (m), Radboudumc
Immune cells need energy to function well. I want to research how the immune system's energy condition depends on the type of infection and how energy metabolism affects immunological response. Insight into this may offer possibilities for improving the effects of vaccinations and for reinforcing immunity in case of infections.

Facing Tinnitus: A fear-conditioning approach to chronic tinnitus suffering
Dr R.F.F. (Rilana) Cima (f), Maastricht University – Audiology
Tinnitus (ringing in the ears), the constant perception of a phantom noise, can hinder patients so much that the quality of their lives is severely affected. The primary objective of my project is to test the less-obvious proposition that it is not the tinnitus noise itself, but instead fears and misinterpretations related to tinnitus, that explain the persistent tinnitus symptoms.

Detecting the invisible water drain: evaporation
Dr A.M.J. (Miriam) Coenders (f), Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences
Knowledge about the largest consumer of water - evaporation - is essential for the prediction of floods and droughts, among other things. Surprisingly, this knowledge is limited due to observation opportunities and costs. The purpose of this study is to increase knowledge about the evaporation process by using innovative evaporation measurements with fibre-optic cable and isotopes.

Risky blood vessels - MRI sees what we can't see
Dr B.F. (Bram) Coolen (m), AMC – Radiology
The risk of a cerebral infarction is strongly determined by the degree of arterial inflammation throughout the entire vascular system between the heart and the head. In this project, the researcher will develop new MRI technology with which the degree of inflammation of the vascular wall can be measured precisely in a single scan session of the carotid artery, aorta and cerebral blood vessels.

Aperiodic Mechanical Metamaterials: Bridging the Gap between Matter and Machine
Dr C.C. (Corentin) Coulais (m), AMOLF - Physics
Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures with extraordinary properties. Since they often have a periodical structure, their capabilities are limited. This project will develop metamaterials with complex mechanical functions using aperiodic structures.

Numerical analysis of non-linear stochastic partial differential equations
Dr S.G. (Sonja) Cox (f), University of Amsterdam - Korteweg-de Vries Institute for Mathematics
Many processes in science are described by (non-linear) stochastic partial differential equations. No explicit solutions exist to these equations. That is why numerical approaches are required to gain insight into the underlying process. The objective of my research is to show that such approaches can be made in an efficient manner.

On target: MRI-driven radiotherapy for moving tumours
Dr S.P.M. (Sjoerd) Crijns (m), University Medical Center Utrecht – Radiotherapy
The integrated MRI/accelerator introduces possibilities for significant increases in the precision of radiotherapy for cancer patients. In this study, new MRI methods will be developed that form the basis for motion corrections during the treatment of tumours that move - due to breathing, for example.

Why do some epidemic diseases lead to hatred? An investigation into the impact of economic inequality on the extent of blame, persecution, hatred, and violence after early modern plagues in the Northern Low Countries
Dr D.R.C. (Daniel) Curtis (m), Utrecht University – History
Epidemics throughout history have led to hatred and fear: from the Black Death and cholera to HIV/AIDS and Ebola. However, epidemic disease could also act as a cohesive force for communities. This project investigates the reasons behind divergent social responses by focusing on plague in the early modern Low Countries. 

D

New Frontiers in Lattice Design
Dr D.N. (Daniel) Dadush (m), CWI - Theoretical Computer Science
Lattices, i.e. regular spatial arrangements of points, have many applications. For instance, wireless mobile phone messages use noise- tolerant lattice encodings and internet communications can be secured by hiding messages within high-dimensional lattices. In this proposal, computer scientists will design new cutting-edge methods for efficiently utilising lattice structure in such applications.

Genetic component for clustering of diabetes within families
Dr A.D. (Ayşe) Demirkan (f), Erasmus MC - Epidemiology
Hereditary material received from the same ancestor (consanguinity) can cause recessively inheritable forms of disease. Consanguinity may also be a risk factor for type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). With this proposal, I wish to find the genetic regions received from the same ancestor that increase the risk of T2DM, by using statistical computer models in a large family study.

The relationship between diabetes and arteriosclerosis
Dr J.A. (Janna) van Diepen (f), Radboudumc – Internal Medicine
Why do people with diabetes have an increased risk of arteriosclerosis? The researchers will measure whether (progenitor) cells in the immune system digest more sugars and more rapidly, causing them to become more active and more aggressive, as during an infection. This can cause damage to the arterial wall more quickly, which in turn causes arteriosclerosis.

E

A job in welfare?
Dr A. (Anja) Eleveld (f), VU University Amsterdam- Social Law
Welfare recipients who are obliged perform labour without wages are subject to the authority of a manager - just like regular employees - but they are not always protected by regular labour law. This project will investigate whether and how a supervisor's authority can be limited by external regulation.

Intravital stem cell imaging to reveal the cellular processes that drive colorectal tissue homeostasis and tumour initiation
Dr S.I.J. (Saskia) Ellenbroek (f), Hubrecht Institute
Our intestinal wall is renewed continuously by stem cells that divide daily. These stem cells turn out to fight for the best spot. The researchers will now visualise this stem cell combat by filming inside intestines with healthy cells and cells containing cancer-causing mutations.

F

Paths through slavery: urban slave agency and empowerment in Suriname, 1700-1863
Dr K.J. (Karwan) Fatah-Black (m), Leiden University – History
Despite severely inhumane conditions, some slave families in Paramaribo were able to improve their fate on their own. Often, historians only have an eye for plantation slavery and large-scale resistance. This projects highlights how primarily female
slaves in the city found a road to freedom for themselves and their families by means of personal relationships, trade and even court cases.

Analysing ‘big data’ for the improvement of personalised treatment of cancer patients
Dr R. (Rudolf) S.N. Fehrmann (m), University Medical Center Groningen –Oncology
I will search for genetic deviations, genes and biological routes that are responsible for tumour behaviour and therapy response. This will help in the development of new cancer therapies and personalised treatment.

Reading between the lines: identifying implicit perspectives through linguistic analyses
Dr A.S. (Antske) Fokkens (f), VU University Amsterdam – Linguistics
How information is displayed can influence our perception. Researchers use automatic text analysis to discover how various sources describe people. Which characteristics and deeds are often stated together? How can scientists from other disciplines use this information to study perception?

New peptides for food, pharmaceuticals and functional materials
P.W.J.M. (Pim) Frederix (m), University of Groningen - Institute for Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology
Recent developments in the area of computer technology now make it possible to discover biomaterials by means of simulations. In this way, scientists can find small, biologically degradable proteins (peptides) that spontaneously form nanostructures. This can be used in cosmetics, food or the biomedical industry for better textures without artificial additives.

G

Intact Protein Analysis (IPA)
Dr A.F.G. (Andrea) Gargano (m), University of Amsterdam - Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences (HIMS)
The objective of the project is to develop an automated multistage analytical system for the separation and characterisation of intact proteins. By linking gel electrophoresis, multidimensional fluid chromatography and mass spectrometry, an automatic system is created with which various manifestations of proteins can be visualised.

Observing the Universe at the longest wavelengths
Dr F. (Francesco) de Gasperin (m), Leiden University – Leiden Observatory
Clusters of galaxies are the farthest and most massive structures in the universe. To visualise the characteristics of clusters and gain a better understanding of their causal history, the proposed project will use LOFAR, ''the Low Frequency Array'', a revolutionary new European radio telescope developed in the Netherlands.

Facing Europe: The personalisation of European Union politics in news coverage and its consequences for democracy
Dr K. (Katjana) Gattermann (f), University of Amsterdam - Social and Behavioural Sciences
Can the personalisation of politics in the news media foster the relationship between politicians and citizens in the European Union? This project will investigate developments in the personalisation of news items in the press in six European Member States and how this influences the knowledge and attitudes of citizens towards the EU.

Poets and Profits: A New History of Dutch Literary Authorship 1550-1750
Dr N. (Nina) Geerdink (f), Radboud University Nijmegen – Literary and Cultural Studies
The literary elite usually looks at the authors of bestsellers with misgivings. In early modern times, this was no different: authors with literary ambitions stated with pride that they did it for the honour, not for the money. This study will burst the balloon of that attitude and demonstrate, on the contrary, the earning opportunities for early modern Dutch authors.

Prevention of diagnostic errors among the aged with a suspicion of a pulmonary embolism
Dr G.J. (Geert-Jan) Geersing (m), University Medical Center Utrecht - Julius Centrum
Since symptoms among old people are sometimes mild, the occurrence of a pulmonary embolism among them is often missed. Referring everyone for a scan is also unsafe. The results can be unclear, resulting in the unnecessary prescription of blood thinners whereas this presents a danger. The researchers will develop methods to prevent both forms of diagnostic errors.

Repairing defective genes in mini-livers
Dr H. (Helmuth) Gehart (m), Hubrecht Institute
Many liver diseases are caused by faulty DNA sequences in liver genes. Researchers plan to isolate liver stem cells from patients and repair the incorrect sequence in their genome. Subsequently, the team wants to show that the corrected cells can be injected into a damaged liver and repair the organ.

Investigating the geochemical and electrochemical controls on the formation, stability, and arsenic uptake mechanism of mixed valent Fe(II,III) phases generated by Fe(0) electrocoagulation
Dr C.M.V.G. (Case) van Genuchten (m), Utrecht University - Geochemistry
Researchers will investigate the formation, stability, and arsenic removal efficiency of unique Fe(II,III) minerals generated by Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC), which is a novel, low-cost arsenic treatment technology. This research can lead to technological breakthroughs that dramatically increase the likelihood of sustained EC system operations in poor arsenic-affected rural communities.

Can peers make youth sick?
Dr M. (Matteo) Giletta (m), Tilburg University – Developmental Psychology
Among youth, experiences of social isolation and rejection can have particularly deleterious and long-lasting effects on well-being. How could this be? This research will clarify this question, by investigating whether negative peer experiences alter the functioning of the immune system. Additionally, it will examine how these effects could be prevented.

Too 'fat' to eat
Dr K.A. (Klaske) Glashouwer (f), University of Groningen – Clinical Psychology
Anorexia nervosa patients eat too little and are often dissatisfied with their bodies. I will investigate a new method of treatment for dysmorphia among people with anorexia. On the basis of this, I will test whether and how dissatisfaction with one's body leads to food restriction.

Jurisprudence under a magnifying glass: can transparency contribute to legitimacy?
Dr S.G. (Stephan) Grimmelikhuijsen (m), Utrecht University – Utrecht School of Governance
Transparency should lead to more support among citizens for the law. However, critics are of the opinion that transparency makes the law more vulnerable to simple criticism: this may actually cause a decrease in legitimacy. In this project, I study whether, how and why transparency contributes to the perceived legitimacy of the law.

Capturing short-lived treats of the Earth's magnetic field
Dr L.V. (Lennart) de Groot, (m), Utrecht University - Paleomagnetic Laboratory
The Earth's magnetic field protects against cosmic radiation that can disrupt communication with aircraft and satellites, for example. The force of the field has decreased by 25% in the last millennium but exactly how the Earth's magnetic field behaves in shorter time periods is unknown. I propose visualising this behaviour in a new way.

Some like it hot
Dr B. (Benny) Guralnik (m), Wageningen University
Temperature is a primary governor of innumerable natural processes, but is very difficult to unravel in the past. This project will calibrate and extend several cutting-edge luminescence and noble-gas techniques, with the aim of reconstructing thermal histories of archaeological fireplaces, and understanding the evolution of fire harnessing. 

H

The influence of noise on processing visual and spatial information
Dr W. (Wouter) Halfwerk (m), Leiden University - Institute of Biology
Animals are bothered by human noise, but the exact effect is still unclear. I will have chickadees search for prey and see how noise disrupts their visual and spatial information processing. With this research, we can better understand how species can adapt themselves and how they should be protected from noise pollution.

How do ageing and social behaviour influence each other?
Dr M. (Martijn) Hammers (m), University of Groningen – Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Parents who are assisted by family members do not need to invest as much in parenting. The researcher will determine whether this assistance delays the ageing of parents in a wild animal population. Mathematical models will then be developed to predict the influence of ageing on social behaviour.

The role of genetic stress in the occurrence of mental retardation
Dr J. (Jayne) Hehir-Kwa (f), Radboudumc - Human Genetics
This research project focuses on the question of how combinations of genetic mutations can lead to intellectual limitation. New genetic and biometric facial information will be used to unravel the impact of genetic mutations on the severity of the intellectual limitation.

The rhythms of the heart
Dr J. (Jordi) Heijman (m), Maastricht University - Cardiology
Heart rhythm disorders are an important cause of death. Calcium ions play a role in the normal electrical activation/contraction of heart muscle cells and in the onset of heart rhythm disorders. In this study, computer models will be developed to determine which calcium-dependent processes have particularly negative consequences. This knowledge will help the development of better treatment methods for heart rhythm disorders in patients.

The trauma-resistant brain
Dr M.J.A.G. (Marloes) Henckens (f), Radboudumc – Department of Cognitive Neuroscience
Posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSS) is a serious disease that occurs after exposure to trauma. However, not everyone who experiences a trauma develops this disease. The researchers will compare the reaction of the PTSS-sensitive brain and the PTSS-resistant brain in order to obtain new insights for treatment.

Alcohol on Social Network Sites
Dr H (Hanneke) Hendriks (f), Leiden University - Social and Organisational Psychology
This project investigates how often and why adolescents talk about alcohol on Social Network Sites (SNS), along with the effects of various statements about alcohol on SNS on alcohol consumption, and why and when these effects occur. An intervention plan will then be developed and tested to counter the harmful effects of alcohol-related statements on SNS.

The molecular interactions allowing Mps1 to safeguard cell division
Dr Y. (Yoshitaka) Hiruma (m), Netherlands Cancer Institute
During cell division, a parent cell divides into two daughter cells, which share the 23 pairs of chromosomes. My research aims to investigate the structure and function of Mps1, which checks the chromosome separation.

Learning to identify risks of new technologies
Dr J. (Jarno) Hoekman (m), Utrecht University - Innovation Studies
Innovations provide solutions to societal problems, but also introduce new risks to health and the environment. The researcher focuses on pharmaceutical innovations and studies how governments, businesses, doctors and patients learn to discover the side effects of medicines. In this manner, he contributes to efficient decision-making and safe treatment.

The language of modernity: Vernacular Malay in pre-independence Indonesia
Dr T.G. (Tom) Hoogervorst (m), KITLV – Literary and Cultural Studies
This project studies the vernacular of the urban middle class in the Dutch East Indies - the so-called "low-Malayan". Non-Europeans used this language to write about themselves and the world they lived in. I will analyse a recently digitised corpus of books and newspapers and demonstrate how the study of language provides new insights into daily life in a multicultural society.

I

The daily governance of transit migration in Turkey at European Union borders: the Europeanisation of Turkish border and migration governance
Dr B. (Beste) Isleyen (f), University of Amsterdam – Political Science
What is the influence of the EU migration regime on Turkish risk perceptions regarding transit migration? What are the effects on the physical control of borders and border crossing in Turkey? How does EU migration policy affect the mobility decisions of the migrants using Turkey as a transit country? New insights into the impact of the EU migration regime on the everyday management of borders and migration in Turkey will be offered.

J

Structure, function and mechanism of Pnu type transporters
Dr M. (Michael) Jaehme (m), University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute
This proposal focuses on the fundamental question of how bacterial cells absorb vitamins. Knowledge about this process can be used to find handholds for new antibiotics and to develop new production methods for high-value chemicals.

Encouraging neuronal identity
Dr A. (Ali) Jahanshahianvar (m), Maastricht University – Neuroscience
Deep brain stimulation is a popular therapy for patients with neurological and psychiatric pathologies. However, the effects are not optimal and side effects can occur. I want to improve this therapy by performing research into the recently discovered change in the identity of brain cells caused by electrical stimulation.

Taking Pictures of Free-flying Electrons
Dr J. (Johannes) Jobst (m) Leiden University – Physics
In graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms, electrons travel large distances without changing direction. The researcher will use a novel microscopy technique to study how these free-flying electrons behave when the devices are switched on and off.

Experience and Design: The Emergence of Architectural Experience in Paris and London, 1750-1815
Dr S.D. (Sigrid) de Jong (f), Leiden University - Art History and Architecture
How you experience a building with your entire body and all of your senses was first expressed in the 18th century. This project investigates which guiding role the experience of architecture will play in descriptions, theories and design practice in two of the most important cultural centres of that period: Paris and London. 

K

Gender differences in the risk profile for atherosclerosis in various blood vessels
Dr M. (Maryam) Kavousi (f), Erasmus MC - Epidemiology
Heart disease and vascular disease are the most important causes of death among both men and women. Hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) is the primary cause for the onset of these diseases. In this project, I will research the extent to which the risk factors, hereditary causes and new biomarkers can explain the difference in hardening of the arteries between men and women.

The impact of expression modalities - speaking versus manual activities - on decision making
Dr A.K. (Anne-Kathrin) Klesse (f), Tilburg University - Tilburg School of Economics and Management
This proposal compares expression modalities— speaking versus manual activities— on decision making. I predict, for instance, that speaking triggers more impulsive decisions and reduces individuals’ tendency to save money. The ultimate goal is to understand differences between these expression modalities and to derive managerial implications and public policy recommendations.

Seeing is believing: Female Muslim leadership and visual communication in Southeast Asia
Dr D. (David) Kloos (m), KITLV – Area studies
Female Muslim leaders are becoming increasingly important. Research in this area is generally limited to the role of women in the written Islamic tradition. This project investigates how female leaders in Southeast Asia use visual images and how they use these to challenge dominant gender relationships within Islam.

The care and development of public value
Dr E. (Eva) Knies (f), Utrecht University – Public Administration and Organisational Science
The requirements placed on the quality of care and education are changing. This study inventories what constitutes good provision of service in nursing homes and schools according to those involved (users, employees, managers), and how this can be achieved.

Understanding symbiotic nitrogen fixation
Dr W (Wouter) Kohlen (m), Wageningen University – Laboratory for Molecular Biology
Signal substances from symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria induce cell mitosis in the roots of some plants. Surprisingly, this happens by means of activating a signalling network that all plants possess. I will research why cell division is induced in the roots of some plants by these soil bacteria and not in others.

The epigenetics of immune defence cells in the brain
Dr S.M. Kooistra (f), University of Groningen, Department of Neuroscience
Microglia cells form the brain's immune system and protect the brain from infections and brain damage. Disrupted microglia activity is involved in diseases in the brain, including neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive disorders. In this research, the disruption of microglial functions will be studied at the epigenetic level for the purpose of developing interventions.

Teaching immune cells to kill cancer
Dr K. (Helmuth) Gehart (m), Hubrecht Institute
Tumours contain immune cells that can recognise and destroy cancerous cells. However, tumour cells often disguise themselves as normal cells to escape this destruction. The researcher aims to develop a method to culture mini-tumours (‘organoids’) with immune cells to screen for new factors stimulating tumour destruction by immune cells.

Deterministic modelling in multiple dimensions
Dr (Ivan) Kryven (m), University of Amsterdam - Mathematics/Computer Science
Formation of planets out of the interstellar dust, emergence of tiny crystals, or growth of your network of friends: regardless colossal difference in the scales and the worlds, hidden similarities stand behind evolution of large populations. I will develop mathematical
tools to help natural scientists to understand, simulate, and foresee these phenomena.

L

Focus on itching
Dr A.I.M. (Antoinette) van Laarhoven (f), Leiden University – Health, Medical and Neuropsychology
Itching is difficult to ignore and there are no effective treatments for chronic itching. Attention plays an important role in chronic pain; this has barely been investigated for itching. This research project will compare the attention processes for itching and for pain, and the capabilities for changing attention processes in both healthy people and in patients.

The strategic dimension of preferences.
Dr M.P (Maël) Lebreton, University of Amsterdam – Brain & Cognition and Amsterdam Business School.
Economists use binary choices to understand people’s preferences. This project will investigate how participants’ choices in such setting not only depend on their core preferences, but also on strategies developed to choose quickly and efficiently.

Intelligent building blocks for good healing
Dr J. (Jeroen) Leijten (m), University of Twente – MIRA
Every tissue in our body is built of small functional units. In this project, the researcher will fabricate various small functional units. These units will be used as building blocks to make complex tissues. These complex tissues can be used as a replacement for worn, damaged or lost organs.
Young connected migrants. Comparing digital practices of young asylum seekers and expatriates in the Netherlands.
Dr K.H.A. (Koen) Leurs (m), Utrecht University – Media studies
Young asylum seekers and expatriates have digital contact with their home countries and countries of residence. I will compare the experiences of young Somalians, Syrians, Americans and Indians in the Netherlands to determine whether Internet use leads to segregation or integration. The research comprises interviews, on-line and off-line observations and analyses smartphones as a pocket archive with meaningful photos.

Modelling meltwater retention in the Greenland ice sheet
Dr S.R.M. B. (Bas) de Boer (m), Utrecht University – Institute for Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht (IMAU)
In the snowpack on Greenland a layer of water was recently discovered that is twice the surface area of the Netherlands. This causes a delayed contribution of meltwater to the rise in sea level. In this project, I will develop a linked snow–meltwater model to simulate the flow of liquid water from the surface, through this layer of water, toward the ocean.

Tropical forest in multifunctional landscapes
Dr M.W.M. Lohbeck (f), Wageningen University
Tropical forests exist primarily in landscapes that have been transformed by man. In a dynamic forest/agricultural area in southern Mexico, I will research the environmental conditions, living conditions and land-use types under which this forest is preserved and by which it contributes to both the protection of biodiversity and to the living of local farmers.

The PERKs of being resistant? On the exploitation of a novel source of nematode resistance in vegetable crops
Dr J.L. (Jose) Lozano Torres (m), Wageningen University - Plant Sciences
Specific resistances that are often used in agricultural crops are increasingly losing their effectiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes. This forces the plant breeding sector to develop source material with alternative forms of resistance - something that is as yet unexplored territory. This project is focused on the exploitation of plant tissues' basic immune responses to the microscopically small injuries caused by invasive nematodes.

Smoking, a habit under development
Dr M. (Maartje) Luijten (f), Radboud University Nijmegen – Behavioural Science Institute
Unhealthy habits such as smoking are associated with health risks. Our brain's functioning can cause differences in the degree to which new habits are adopted. In this project, the development of smoking as a habitual behaviour among high-risk youth will be studied using brain research. 

M

Increased risk of obstructed coronary arteries in the case of blood clotting disorders
Dr B.K. (Khan) Mahmoodi (m), University Medical Center Groningen / St. Antonius Ziekenhuis Nieuwegein - Cardiology
The researcher presumes that genetically reinforced blood clotting, which increases the risk of the formation of clots in veins, also plays an important role in the occurrence of heart attacks and the obstruction of diversions in the coronary arteries.

Deformations in Poisson geometry
Dr I.T. (Ioan) Marcut (m), Radboud University Nijmegen - IMAPP
How objects can be deformed and what limits their deformation is fundamental to geometry. A sheet of paper can take many forms, but not the surface of a sphere. This project will study deformations in Poisson geometry, the mathematical language of classical mechanics.

The earlier the better - focusing on mitochondrial ROS as an early intervention in systemic sclerosis
Dr W. (Wioleta) Marut (f), University Medical Center Utrecht - Immunology
The researchers will study how the lack of oxygen initiates a process that results in the development of systematic sclerosis. A better understanding of this process will lead to the development of new medication and improved healthcare for these patients.

Bayesian approach to cognitive process models of response inhibition
Dr D. (Dora) Matzke (f), University of Amsterdam – Social and Behavioural Sciences, Psychology, Psychological Methodology
Which cognitive processes play a role in interrupting - inhibiting - an activity that has already been started? The goal of this project is to develop a framework for process models of response inhibition that provide scientists with the possibility to evaluate the relative contributions of cognitive processes to response inhibition on the basis of Bayesian model selection.

Valuable chemical heritage from the genes of plants
Dr M.H. (Marnix) Medema (m), Wageningen University - Bioinformatics Group
Plants produce all kinds of valuable substances that are used in medicines, insecticides and food additives. The capacity to produce these substances is stored in their genes. By designing clever computer algorithms, the researchers want to visualise these genes and their mutual relationships so that new products can be developed more efficiently.

Nano-medicinal treatment and diagnostic testing for prostate cancer
Dr R. (Roy) van der Meel (m), University Medical Center Utrecht Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Haematology
Worldwide, prostate cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer among men. The objective of this research is to develop a tumour-focused nano-medicinal treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer, supported by an accompanying diagnostic test based on small cell membrane vesicles from blood and urine samples.

A better understanding of labour exploitation
Dr M.J. (Masja) van Meeteren (f), Leiden University - Criminology
Since labour exploitation has been criminalised as human trafficking, new cases arise regularly. However, it is unclear exactly how labour exploitation comes about. Which types of labour exploitation exist and how can these be understood? These questions will be answered using a newly developed research approach that focuses on both victims and employers.

What & Where: Learning Visual Representations of Concepts in Context
Dr T.E.J. (Thomas) Mensink (m), University of Amsterdam – Informatics Institute
Each day, millions of photos are made. To index, classify and analyse them automatically, the photos must be translated into a language understandable to humans. This proposal will investigate combinations and relationships among various objects, scenes and persons in an image in order to generate understandable translations.

Magnets out of the comfort zone
J.H. (Johan) Mentink (m) Radboud University Nijmegen – Physics
Magnetism occurs due to the interactions between electrons. The researchers want to understand how quickly magnets can be manipulated using the ultrafast dynamics of electrons' charge and angular momentum; for this they will develop a non-equilibrium quantum theory.

Fatty consolation of a stressed brain
Dr F.J. (Frank) Meye (m), University Medical Center Groningen – BCRM
After stress, many people eat junk food in order to "de-stress". However, in a society with an abundance of stress and food, this increases the risk of obesity. This research will measure electrical signals between specific areas of the brain that are involved with food reward in order to see how stress affects the system to the extent that we overeat.

Mathematics helps people with vascular diseases
Dr J. (Julia) Mikhal (f), University of Twente, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science
Aneurysms or stenoses in the brain form an important pathology that affects numerous people and forms a risk of life-threatening haemorrhage or blockage. Mathematical models will support the treatment process by providing qualitative insights into the future course of the disease and in finding optimal treatment solutions.

Is that your telephone?
Dr M. (Michelle) Moerel (f), Maastricht University – Cognitive Neuroscience
Our daily environment is full of noise. Using strong MRI scanners, this project will investigate how the flexibility in that portion of our brain that processes sounds allows us to recognise and understand the relevant sounds - such as the sound of your own telephone.

Combining statistics and clinics for better patient care
Dr M.M. (Mostafa) Mokhles (m), Erasmus MC – Thoracic Surgery
These days, patients can live to adulthood with a congenital heart defect. Unfortunately, they must undergo several heart operations throughout their lives. This project will develop predictive methods to determine the optimum moment for each required heart operation so that the total number of heart operations throughout the lives of these patients can be minimised.

Psychological measurement procedures for responses and response times
Dr D. (Dylan) Molenaar (m), University of Amsterdam – Psychology
Statements about psychological characteristics such as intelligence are based on the answers that respondents give to test questions. In this project, suitable procedures will be developed that - in addition to the answers - also take the response times to questions into account in order to give a verdict on the psychological differences between and within people.

Revisiting the Foundations of Cutting Planes: Bringing Theory Closer to Practice
Dr M. (Marco) Molinaro (m), Delft University of Technology – Department of Applied Mathematics
Mixed-Integer Linear Programming (MILP) is a widely used tool for decision-making with huge economic and societal impact. Here I propose methods for improving the efficiency of solving MILPs, which has the potential of increasing the applicability and accuracy of the models used in several areas.

Soil bugs and hyphal strands: natural recovery underground
Dr E (Elly) Morriën (f) University of Amsterdam – Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics
The recovery of nature on former agricultural grounds is expensive, slow and does not always provide the desired result. My research will focus on the role of soil organisms in ecosystem development during natural recovery of former farmlands with the purpose of obtaining insight into secondary succession and of obtaining methods allowing for more successful natural recovery.

Capturing the Laws of Data Nature
Dr H.F. (Hannes) Mühleisen (m), CWI - Database Architectures Group
The Big Data Analysis process can be improved and accelerated considerably if a Data Management System makes statistical and analytical models paramount. The scientific challenge is to use these models as a replacement for data storage and to answer queries with sufficient guarantees of precision.

O

Dynamical neural networks in health and disease: panta rhei
Dr W.M. (Willem) Otte (m), University Medical Center Utrecht - Image Sciences Institute
An understanding of the function and operation of networks, requires insight into dynamic changes, especially at central intersections. Using a new method, I will characterise this dynamic in the brain - a complex and rapidly changing network like no other - both in a healthy state and after brain damage.

P

Better Science Through Better Crowdsourcing
Dr G.P. (Gabriele) Paolacci (m), Erasmus University Rotterdam - Marketing Management
Crowdsourcing is revolutionising how social scientists conduct research. However, little is known about the scientific perils of recruiting research participants on online marketplaces. This project will investigate how research data quality depends on characteristics of the crowdsourcing process that are relevant across research paradigms and platforms.

The regulation of protein stability in the brain
Dr M.C. (Cristina) Gontan Pardo (f), Erasmus MC – Developmental Biology
Proteins are created and broken down continuously to ensure the proper amounts and ratios - also in our brains. The researchers will study an enzyme that breaks down proteins to gain a better understanding of what it does in the brain and why mutations in such enzymes lead to mental retardation.

Enhancing Nature’s catalysts: new vitamins for enzymes
Dr C. E. (Caroline) Paul (f), Delft University of Technology - Biocatalysis
Nature’s catalysts, enzymes, are extraordinary at performing chemical reactions. These enzymes require expensive and unstable vitamin derivatives to catalyse reactions. Through the combination of chemistry and biology, researchers will produce new and improved vitamin B3 derivatives to enhance the use of enzymes for industrial
applications.

Seeing where I am: visual observation during navigation
Dr J. (Jasper) Poort (m), Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - Vision and Cognition
How do our brains selectively process the most relevant sensory impressions as we move through the world? In order to understand this, the researcher will study the link between areas of the brain that process visual information and our brain's navigation system.

R

Making mathematical sense of large networks
Dr G. (Guus) Regts, (m), University of Amsterdam – Mathematics
Researchers have developed the concept of graph limits so that they can analyse very large networks such as Facebook and the Internet itself using mathematics. In this project, I will study graph limits based on models from statistical mechanics.

Landscapes of war in Roman literature
Dr B.L. (Bettina) Reitz-Joosse (f) Literary and Cultural Studies
'Veni, vidi, vici,' Caesar said: 'I came, I saw, I conquered.' But how did the other Romans view all those wars? I will show how Roman writers derived meaning from the battlefields and in that way contributed to the formation of social thinking concerning man, violence and nature.

Genetics for economists
Dr C.A. (Niels) Rietveld (m), Erasmus University Rotterdam - School of Economics
Many socioeconomic characteristics, such as one's position in the labour market and educational level, are partially hereditary. This project looks for the genes that are related to these characteristics, whether these genes influence various socioeconomic characteristics simultaneously, and analyses whether people who are genetically different respond differently to policy measures.

Learning the language of predictions
Dr J.C. (Jacolien) Van Rij-Tange (f), University of Groningen – Linguistics
What pronouns such as “he" or “she" refer to, changes from sentence to sentence. This project applies the learning theory of Rescorla and Wagner to the acquisition of pronouns. The central idea behind this theory is that children learn from incorrect predictions. The project will combine experiments, corpus research and computational modelling.

Addressing Ethical Challenges of the Service Robot Revolution
Dr A. (Aimee) Robbins-van Wynsberghe (f), University of Twente – Philosophy
The 21st century is predicted to be the century of service robots. Given that design choices impact both the good and bad outcomes of robots, we must ask: Is ethics taken into account in their development and implementation? This Veni project will build a new
ethical approach to address the development and implementation of service robots.

Nudging Responsibly. The Impact of Choice Architecture on Responsibility Attributions
Dr P.J. (Philip) Robichaud (m), Delft University of Technology – Philosophy
"Nudges" are signals that are embedded in one's selection environment and that result in predictable effects on behaviour. Do people deserve blame if they foment evil and praise if they achieve a given good? This project develops theories that address this question and that form a basis for guidelines for ethically responsible “nudging".

Encouraging creativity, even when things are not going your way
Dr M. (Marieke) Roskes (f), Utrecht University – Social and Organisational Psychology
People who fear failure often set to work carefully and systematically. Combined with fear of failure, this makes it difficult to come up with creative ideas, while these can then indeed be very useful. This research tests interventions for encouraging creativity, even in the face of obstacles.

Design of 2-dimensional soft materials
Dr L. (Laura) Rossi (f), University of Amsterdam - Physics
Despite their importance in science and technology, 2D materials are difficult to study directly at the atomic scale. The researchers will assemble smart micron-size particles into directionally bonded 2D structures mimicking atomic systems, allowing observation of single particle behaviours.

Between local debts and global markets: Explaining slavery in South and Southeast Asia, 1600-1800
Dr M. (Matthias) van Rossum (m), International Institute of Social History – History
The Dutch history of slavery is often viewed from an Atlantic perspective. Due to this, the large-scale history of slavery in Asia remains underrepresented. This project will demonstrate that the traditional image of “mild" and “non-economic" slavery does not apply to the vast VOC area and, using VOC archives, will study how slave labour was used for production for world markets.

S

Race against the robot?
Dr A.M. (Anna) Salomons (f), Utrecht University – Economics
Technological progress is the engine of our economic growth, but it also requires important adaptations to our society. This project will study the effects of the Digital Revolution on the labour markets, such as those resulting from automation by robots and other digital technologies. These effects will be both theoretically modelled and empirically assessed.

Occasionalism and the secularisation of early modern science: Understanding the dismissal of divine action during the scientific revolution
Dr A. (Andrea) Sangiacomo (m), University of Groningen – Philosophy
Science was still theology based in the 17th century; in the 18th century, this was apparently no longer the case. Why did this change take place? This project will study how the secularisation of science was encouraged by the responses of a few natural philosophers to the “occasionalistic" idea that God intervenes continuously in nature.

Econometric methods for assessing non-standard monetary policy impacts
Dr J. (Julia) Schaumburg (f), VU University Amsterdam - Econometrics
The global financial crisis has triggered monetary interventions and tighter financial regulation. But does the impact of such measures last or does it evaporate quickly? And do they lead to the desired outcomes? These questions are addressed, using flexible, newly developed econometric methods.

Fields of opportunity: crop cultivation in Northwestern Europe's coastal salt marshes, 600 BC to 800 AD
Dr M. (Mans) Schepers (m), University of Groningen – Archaeology
Many archaeologists think that crop cultivation in wet areas was problematic. Nonetheless, crop cultivation layers have been encountered in excavations in the area of terp villages, along with a broad range of crops. Using plant remains from this salt marsh area, combined with experimental research, this project will show that crop cultivation is possible here without land reclamation.

Glycoflux – from diagnosis to galactose
Dr M. (Monique) van Scherpenzeel (f), Radboudumc – Translational Metabolic Laboratory
Galactose presents a paradox: galactose is poisonous, it is thought to accelerate the ageing process, and it is deadly for yeast cells with a defective phosphoglucomutase (PGM1). But PGM1 patients would appear, by contrast, to get better from galactose. The researcher wants to understand the reason for this and to try to find a similar solution to comparable diseases.

How mistakes in DNA lead to infections
Dr P.A (Pauline) van Schouwenburg (f), Erasmus MC – Immunology
Our immune system protects us from infections. Some people's immune systems do not work well, causing them to be extra vulnerable to infections. The researchers will examine the DNA of patients to see if they can discover 'errors' that cause a poor functioning of their immune systems, as a result of which these patients suffer from a disease called CVID.

How do chromatin modifications determine the aggressiveness of plant pathogens?
Dr M.F (Michael) Seidl (m), Wageningen University – Laboratory of Phytopathology
Hereditary characteristics are determined not only genetically by means of DNA sequence, but also epigenetically by means of reversible adaptations in DNA. The causes of plant diseases change their hereditary characteristics rapidly to evade recognition by the host. The researcher wants to determine how epigenetic changes in the DNA of pathogens influence their aggressiveness.

Towards design in porous architectures
Dr B. (Beatriz) Seoane (f), Delft University of Technology - Chemical Engineering
Although nanostructured porous materials are widely used in industry, the development of tools to control their shape is still in its infancy. The researchers will use state-of-the-art tools largely unexplored in porous materials synthesis to allow their manufacture with predesigned architecture, thus optimising utilisation.

Personal preferences in on-line health communication
Dr E.S. (Eline) Smit (f), University of Amsterdam - Communication Science
Using online messages about health, people can improve their lifestyles in order to prevent chronic diseases. However, not everyone wants to have such messages presented in the same way. The investigation will determine how the presentation of online health messages can best be aligned to people's personal preferences.

Resistant moulds
Dr E (Eveline) Snelders (f), Wageningen University
Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important cause of invasive aspergillosis in patients with weakened immune systems. A strong increase has been found of Aspergillus strains that are resistant to anti-fungal agents. Mortality rates among these patients are therefore more than 90%. In my research, the factors that cause this resistance will be studied.

The Islamic Faith and Democratic Support in the Middle East
Dr C.H.B.M. (Niels) Spierings (m), Radboud University Nijmegen - Sociology
Are strong believers in Islam in the Middle East less democratic? This research will demonstrate whether and how religious convictions truly undermine or sometimes foster democratisation. Particular attention will be paid to the political role and repression of Islam.

Growing artificial cells
Dr E. (Evan) Spruijt (m), Radboud University Nijmegen – Institute for Molecules and Materials
Every living thing is comprised of cells, but these apparently simple building blocks are extremely complex chemically. In this research, three sorts of artificial cells will be made that grow independently, just as living cells do, before replicating, Simulating cell growth in artificial cells helps us better understand how living cells work.

The web that was
Dr M. (Michael) Stevenson (m), University of Groningen – Media Studies
Facebook, Google, YouTube: we use the web every day but know very little about how it has developed. This research analyses the history of the web using the Perl programming language. It provides insight into the economic, cultural and technological developments of the historical web and, with this, provides input for the development of the future web.

Spreading Fertile Ideas - Social Network Influences on Having Children
Dr G. (Gert) Stulp (m), University of Groningen - Sociology
The significant decrease in the number of births in the 20th century might be explained in part by the influence of social interactions. The proposal aims for long-term data collection of networks and child choices in two populations with strongly differing birth rates. Recently developed analysis methods will be used to demonstrate possible network influences on child choice.

The history of the measurable me
Dr F. (Fenneke) Sysling (f), Utrecht University – History
Since the 19th century, people have measured their bodies in order to learn more about themselves. This research shows how people appropriated this quantification from science and applied it at the individual level and how this has formed our identity.

T

The art of persuasion
Dr S. (Susanne) Täuber (f), University of Groningen - Human Resource Management & Organisational Behaviour
It is important to convince people to live healthy lives, but what if well-intentioned efforts work adversely? If being healthy is seen as a moral obligation, this may lead to defensive behaviour. I will research the effects of moral judgement on the self-reliant participatory society that we strive for.

Fly-bond: more efficient lightweight aircraft structures
Dr S. (Sofia) Teixeira de Freitas (f), Delft University of Technology
Would you be afraid to fly in a bonded aircraft? This Veni project will contribute for the acceptance of bonded joints in composite aircraft. Why? It is one of the key strategies to build more efficient composite aircraft and reduce transportation carbon footprint.

Fewer cases of severe congenital cardiac arrhythmia?
Dr A.J.M. (Anke) Tijsen (f), AMC – Cardiology
In hereditary cardiac arrhythmia, not all patients with the same mutation (change in the genetic material) have the same severity of the disorder. The researchers want to find out whether additional variations in the sick gene can explain this difference. On the basis of these additional variants, they will try to develop a new therapy for this heart rhythm disorder.

Rethinking Energy Harvesting for MEMS (REH-MEMS): High Performance at Random Slow Motion
Dr N. (Nima) Tolou (m), Delft University of Technology - Precision and Microsystems Engineering (PME)
By the year 2020, more than 20 billion low-voltage, wireless electric devices will need a battery. The objective of REH-MEMS is to breach this limitation by harvesting energy efficiently from daily motions to provide these micro-devices with power so that they can perform without a battery throughout their entire lifespan.

V

Less confusion from dynamic information
Dr K.A.B. (Kevin) Verbeek (m), Eindhoven University of Technology – Mathematics and Computer Science
A good illustration of how dynamic information changes requires that small changes in the data must result in small changes in the illustration. However, there is no suitable theory for that sort of stable algorithm. The researcher will study the theoretical aspects of stable algorithms and apply these to practical problems.

Opening the door to therapeutic proteins to fight cancer
Dr W.P.R. (Wouter) Verdurmen (m), Radboudumc – Department of Biochemistry
Therapeutic proteins are suitable as medicines for many types of cancer, but they must be delivered to the tumour in sufficient quantities. To study this release process, tumours will be grown on a chip and strategies will be tested to improve the release, which will improve the effectiveness of the proteins as medicines.

Neighbours from hell: between eviction and a solution to residential nuisance
Dr M. (Michel) Vols (m), University of Groningen – Law
Many people experience residential nuisance. Landlords and judges try to tackle the nuisance by means of eviction. This is not solution-oriented. Eviction can only take place in a late phase; it is also expensive and only shifts the problem. In this project, an alternative approach will be developed in which victims are helped earlier and those causing nuisance do not become homeless.

Gestures and face
Dr C.L.G. (Connie) de Vos (f), Radboud University Nijmegen/Max Planck Insitute – Linguistics
In spontaneous conversations, sign language users use not only their hands but also their body movements and facial expressions. With a comparison of Dutch sign language and the new sign language of Kata Kolok, the origin and functions of these facial expressions can be determined. This research annotates and analyses recordings of spontaneous sign language conversations.

More equality for foreigners?
Dr K.M. (Karin) de Vries (f), VU University Amsterdam – Constitutional and Administrative Law
Does the law protect foreigners from unequal treatment on the basis of their nationality? Or are they outsiders to whom the right to equal treatment does not apply? This research project investigates the role of nationality in non-discrimination law.

Heart of Darkness: dark matter illuminated
Dr J. (Jordy) de Vries (m) FOM-Nikhef – Physics
Strong indications exist that our universe consists partially of dark matter. This research develops new theoretical methods for describing collisions between dark matter and atomic nuclei. The purpose is to unravel the mysterious nature of dark matter.  

W

New role for receptors in cancer
Dr G.J.P. (Gerard) van Westen (m), Leiden University – LACDR/Cluster Drug & Target Discovery
Death from cancer is one of the most important causes of death in the Netherlands. Research reveals that so-called receptors are often present in cancer tissues in an altered form. Receptors are the most important class of “target proteins" that medicines attach to in other forms of disease. In this “computational" project, the role of receptors in cancer growth will be studied and utilised.

Taking a shine to industrial catalysts
Dr G.T. (Gareth) Whiting, (m), Utrecht University – Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis
Catalysts and their rational design are vitally important for improving the production efficiency of many of our everyday needs, such as transportation fuels and chemicals. This project aims to use advanced tools to understand processes in industrial-scale catalysts in detail. This will shed light on how to improve their design.

Gendering Sacred Space: Female Networks, Patronage, and Ritual Experience in Early Christian Pilgrimage
Dr E. S. (Marlena) Whiting (f), University of Amsterdam – Archaeology
Many of the earliest Christian pilgrims to the Holy Land were women. Their stories survive to this day, but scholars so far have not considered how their gender shaped their experiences. This project will investigate how women performed pilgrimage and experienced their encounters with the sacred in the Early Christian centuries.

Enacting the Coal Enclave: Corporate Sovereignty in Central Mozambique
Dr N. (Nikkie) Wiegink (f), Utrecht University - Cultural Anthropology
Transnational companies are viewed as a sustainable alternative to development aid, but at the same time they would appear to weaken the role of the state. This ethnographic study in and around a coal mine in Mozambique questions how these dynamics contribute to the sovereign position of transnational companies in marginal areas of resource-rich nations.

Squeezing light into nanometric gaps: A live view of protein diffusion in the photosynthetic membrane
Dr I.E. (Emilie) Wientjes (f), Wageningen University - Laboratory of Biophysics
Plants derive their energy from light, but light intensity and colour vary strongly throughout the day. During evolution, plants have developed mechanisms for growing well under these fluctuating conditions. The researchers will study these mechanisms with molecular precision. For this, an advanced microscopic technique will be developed.

Where Helen of Troy lived: reconstructing the urbanisation of the Mycenaean town at Ayios Vasilios
Dr C.W. (Corien) Wiersma (f), University of Groningen – Archaeology
In Greece (Ayios Vasilios), remains have been found of the palace of King Menelaeus and the beautiful Helen. The urbanisation process of the palatial settlement will be investigated by means of geophysics and a field survey. The results will be used to study the rise of the Bronze Age palace-states and for the protection of the area of discovery.

Controlling recombination: New strategies for reverse breeding
Dr T.G. (Erik) Wijnker (m), Wageningen University – Plant Sciences
New breeds of plants are created by crossing plants and selecting plants possessing new combinations of characteristics from among the progeny. This research will search in a targeted way for new, fast and efficient ways of gaining control over the largely coincidental process of the inheritance of properties. More efficient plant breeding is the goal.

Z

Real-Time Studies at the Nanoscale of the Liquid-Phase Synthesis of Zeolite-Based Catalysts
Dr J. (Jovana) Zecevic (f), Utrecht University - Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis
The creation of improved and new catalysts is necessary to obtain more and higher quality fuels. To find out what occurs when catalysts are being created, researchers want to make the first real-time observations of process at the nanometric scale.

How do our actions shape our perception?
Dr F. (Fleur) Zeldenrust (f), Radboud University Nijmegen – Donders Institute
We move our bodies in response to our experiences and our experiences are affected by how we move our bodies. The researchers will study this interaction using mathematical models and computer simulations using the whiskers of rodents as a model system.

Towards realistic predictions for new physics searches at the LHC
Dr L. (Lisa) Zeune (f), FOM-Nikhef – Physics
What is the universe made of? What is dark matter? The Large Hadron Collider will answer these questions by searching for new physics. This quest is possible only with realistic and precise theoretical predictions for new physics processes. These will be made in this project.

Bacteria irritate your lungs' nerves
Dr M.A.D. (Marieke) van Zoelen (f), University Medical Center Utrecht - Immunology
Bacterial pulmonary septicaemia is a life-threatening infectious disease. The researchers will study the lung's infection reflex by establishing how nerve endings in the lungs recognise bacteria and then inhibit the damaging lung infection and, finally, how this can be used as a handhold for a new treatment strategy in the fight against pulmonary septicaemia. 

Naar boven

Sorted bij NWO division

Earth and Life Sciences

Behaviour and molecular signature of neural stem cells, and changes occurring during aging
Dr B.A. (Benedetta) Artegiani (f), Hubrecht Institute
Stem cells in the brain produce neurons throughout life. However, distinct subtypes of neural stem cells could contribute differently to this process. I will distinguish those different subtypes, study their behaviour, identify molecules responsible for their specific functions, and investigate how those properties change with aging.

Brain cannabis predisposes (early) vulnerability
Dr P. (Piray) Atsak (f), Radboudumc – Cognitive Neuroscience
Healthy brain development is rooted in the quality of our relationships with early caregivers. Child neglect or child abuse can create vulnerability to psychiatric diseases. I will research how the endogenous cannabis system in the brain is involved in the long-term effects of early neglect on brain function and emotional behaviour.

Determining the mechanisms of TAD formation and their role in transcriptional regulation
Dr J.G. (Joke) van Bemmel (f), Erasmus MC, Reproduction and Development
The turning on and off of genes is affected by interactions with other pieces of DNA. Due to breaks in strands of DNA, such as in cancer cells, a gene ends up in a new environment and has other contacts. The researchers will analyse whether the new environment has an effect on turning that gene on or off.

Correspondence between climate and regional changes in sea level
Dr B. (Bas) de Boer (m), Utrecht University – Institute for Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht (IMAU)
Over the next century, the Antarctic ice sheet and the Greenland ice sheet will contribute significantly to the rise in sea level. In this project, I will simultaneously simulate the climate, ice caps and regional sea levels of the late Pliocene era to gain a better understanding of the consequences of a warmer climate.

You learn who your friends are when under stress
Dr N.J. (Neeltje) Boogert (f), Wageningen University – Animal Sciences
Animals differ, just as we do, in the number and strength of their social contacts. Can early life experiences predict later network positions? The researcher will expose chicks to competition and food scarcity and will measure how these stress factors affect the birds' later social lives. This research will help explain social animal behaviour.

Detecting the invisible water drain: evaporation
Dr A.M.J. (Miriam) Coenders (f), Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences
Knowledge about the largest consumer of water - evaporation - is essential for the prediction of floods and droughts, among other things. Surprisingly, this knowledge is limited due to observation opportunities and costs. The purpose of this study is to increase knowledge about the evaporation process by using innovative evaporation measurements with fibre-optic cable and isotopes.

Intravital stem cell imaging to reveal the cellular processes that drive colorectal tissue homeostasis and tumour initiation
Dr S.I.J. (Saskia) Ellenbroek (f), Hubrecht Institute
Our intestinal wall is renewed continuously by stem cells that divide daily. These stem cells turn out to fight for the best spot. The researchers will now visualise this stem cell combat by filming inside intestines with healthy cells and cells containing cancer-causing mutations.

Capturing short-lived treats of the Earth's magnetic field
Dr L.V. (Lennart) de Groot, (m), Utrecht University - Paleomagnetic Laboratory
The Earth's magnetic field protects against cosmic radiation that can disrupt communication with aircraft and satellites, for example. The force of the field has decreased by 25% in the last millennium but exactly how the Earth's magnetic field behaves in shorter time periods is unknown. I propose visualising this behaviour in a new way.

The influence of noise on processing visual and spatial information
Dr W. (Wouter) Halfwerk (m), Leiden University - Institute of Biology
Animals are bothered by human noise, but the exact effect is still unclear. I will have chickadees search for prey and see how noise disrupts their visual and spatial information processing. With this research, we can better understand how species can adapt themselves and how they should be protected from noise pollution.

How do ageing and social behaviour influence each other?
Dr M. (Martijn) Hammers (m), University of Groningen – Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Parents who are assisted by family members do not need to invest as much in parenting. The researcher will determine whether this assistance delays the ageing of parents in a wild animal population. Mathematical models will then be developed to predict the influence of ageing on social behaviour.

The trauma-resistant brain
Dr M.J.A.G. (Marloes) Henckens (f), Radboudumc – Department of Cognitive Neuroscience
Posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSS) is a serious disease that occurs after exposure to trauma. However, not everyone who experiences a trauma develops this disease. The researchers will compare the reaction of the PTSS-sensitive brain and the PTSS-resistant brain in order to obtain new insights for treatment.

Understanding symbiotic nitrogen fixation
Dr W (Wouter) Kohlen (m), Wageningen University – Laboratory for Molecular Biology
Signal substances from symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria induce cell mitosis in the roots of some plants. Surprisingly, this happens by means of activating a signalling network that all plants possess. I will research why cell division is induced in the roots of some plants by these soil bacteria and not in others.

The epigenetics of immune defence cells in the brain
Dr S.M. Kooistra (f), University of Groningen, Department of Neuroscience
Microglia cells form the brain's immune system and protect the brain from infections and brain damage. Disrupted microglia activity is involved in diseases in the brain, including neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive disorders. In this research, the disruption of microglial functions will be studied at the epigenetic level for the purpose of developing interventions.

Modelling meltwater retention in the Greenland ice sheet
Dr S.R.M. B. (Bas) de Boer (m), Utrecht University – Institute for Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht (IMAU)
In the snowpack on Greenland a layer of water was recently discovered that is twice the surface area of the Netherlands. This causes a delayed contribution of meltwater to the rise in sea level. In this project, I will develop a linked snow–meltwater model to simulate the flow of liquid water from the surface, through this layer of water, toward the ocean.

Tropical forest in multifunctional landscapes
Dr M.W.M. Lohbeck (f), Wageningen University
Tropical forests exist primarily in landscapes that have been transformed by man. In a dynamic forest/agricultural area in southern Mexico, I will research the environmental conditions, living conditions and land-use types under which this forest is preserved and by which it contributes to both the protection of biodiversity and to the living of local farmers.

Valuable chemical heritage from the genes of plants
Dr M.H. (Marnix) Medema (m), Wageningen University - Bioinformatics Group
Plants produce all kinds of valuable substances that are used in medicines, insecticides and food additives. The capacity to produce these substances is stored in their genes. By designing clever computer algorithms, the researchers want to visualise these genes and their mutual relationships so that new products can be developed more efficiently.

Fatty consolation of a stressed brain
Dr F.J. (Frank) Meye (m), University Medical Center Groningen – BCRM
After stress, many people eat junk food in order to "de-stress". However, in a society with an abundance of stress and food, this increases the risk of obesity. This research will measure electrical signals between specific areas of the brain that are involved with food reward in order to see how stress affects the system to the extent that we overeat.

Soil bugs and hyphal strands: natural recovery underground
Dr E (Elly) Morriën (f) University of Amsterdam – Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics
The recovery of nature on former agricultural grounds is expensive, slow and does not always provide the desired result. My research will focus on the role of soil organisms in ecosystem development during natural recovery of former farmlands with the purpose of obtaining insight into secondary succession and of obtaining methods allowing for more successful natural recovery.

The regulation of protein stability in the brain
Dr M.C. (Cristina) Gontan Pardo (f), Erasmus MC – Developmental Biology
Proteins are created and broken down continuously to ensure the proper amounts and ratios - also in our brains. The researchers will study an enzyme that breaks down proteins to gain a better understanding of what it does in the brain and why mutations in such enzymes lead to mental retardation.

Seeing where I am: visual observation during navigation
Dr J. (Jasper) Poort (m), Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - Vision and Cognition
How do our brains selectively process the most relevant sensory impressions as we move through the world? In order to understand this, the researcher will study the link between areas of the brain that process visual information and our brain's navigation system.

How do chromatin modifications determine the aggressiveness of plant pathogens?
Dr M.F (Michael) Seidl (m), Wageningen University – Laboratory of Phytopathology
Hereditary characteristics are determined not only genetically by means of DNA sequence, but also epigenetically by means of reversible adaptations in DNA. The causes of plant diseases change their hereditary characteristics rapidly to evade recognition by the host. The researcher wants to determine how epigenetic changes in the DNA of pathogens influence their aggressiveness.

Resistant moulds
Dr E (Eveline) Snelders (f), Wageningen University
Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important cause of invasive aspergillosis in patients with weakened immune systems. A strong increase has been found of Aspergillus strains that are resistant to anti-fungal agents. Mortality rates among these patients are therefore more than 90%. In my research, the factors that cause this resistance will be studied.

Squeezing light into nanometric gaps: A live view of protein diffusion in the photosynthetic membrane
Dr I.E. (Emilie) Wientjes (f), Wageningen University - Laboratory of Biophysics
Plants derive their energy from light, but light intensity and colour vary strongly throughout the day. During evolution, plants have developed mechanisms for growing well under these fluctuating conditions. The researchers will study these mechanisms with molecular precision. For this, an advanced microscopic technique will be developed.

Chemical Sciences

Fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria
Dr A. A. (Andreas) Bastian (m) University of Groningen - Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the fact that the development of antibiotics is commercially unattractive form a threat to patients who are infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria. The proposed research focuses on the discovery of medicinal candidates that bypass resistance to carbapenems, the last resort against bacteria.

A Novel Supramolecular System for Membrane Fusion and Biosensing
Dr A.L. (Aimee) Boyle (f), Leiden University - Leiden Institute of Chemistry
From simple building blocks, I will design a new supramolecular system that performs two functions. It can help explain membrane fusion - a crucial process in our bodies. It can also be used as a biosensor for detecting contamination in sources of water.

New peptides for food, pharmaceuticals and functional materials
P.W.J.M. (Pim) Frederix (m), University of Groningen - Institute for Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology
Recent developments in the area of computer technology now make it possible to discover biomaterials by means of simulations. In this way, scientists can find small, biologically degradable proteins (peptides) that spontaneously form nanostructures. This can be used in cosmetics, food or the biomedical industry for better textures without artificial additives.

Intact Protein Analysis (IPA)
Dr A.F.G. (Andrea) Gargano (m), University of Amsterdam - Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences (HIMS)
The objective of the project is to develop an automated multistage analytical system for the separation and characterisation of intact proteins. By linking gel electrophoresis, multidimensional fluid chromatography and mass spectrometry, an automatic system is created with which various manifestations of proteins can be visualised.

The molecular interactions allowing Mps1 to safeguard cell division
Dr Y. (Yoshitaka) Hiruma (m), Netherlands Cancer Institute
During cell division, a parent cell divides into two daughter cells, which share the 23 pairs of chromosomes. My research aims to investigate the structure and function of Mps1, which checks the chromosome separation.

Structure, function and mechanism of Pnu type transporters
Dr M. (Michael) Jaehme (m), University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute
This proposal focuses on the fundamental question of how bacterial cells absorb vitamins. Knowledge about this process can be used to find handholds for new antibiotics and to develop new production methods for high-value chemicals.

Enhancing Nature’s catalysts: new vitamins for enzymes
Dr C. E. (Caroline) Paul (f), Delft University of Technology - Biocatalysis
Nature’s catalysts, enzymes, are extraordinary at performing chemical reactions. These enzymes require expensive and unstable vitamin derivatives to catalyse reactions. Through the combination of chemistry and biology, researchers will produce new and improved vitamin B3 derivatives to enhance the use of enzymes for industrial applications.

Towards design in porous architectures
Dr B. (Beatriz) Seoane (f), Delft University of Technology - Chemical Engineering
Although nanostructured porous materials are widely used in industry, the development of tools to control their shape is still in its infancy. The researchers will use state-of-the-art tools largely unexplored in porous materials synthesis to allow their manufacture with predesigned architecture, thus optimising utilisation.

Growing artificial cells
Dr E. (Evan) Spruijt (m), Radboud University Nijmegen – Institute for Molecules and Materials
Every living thing is comprised of cells, but these apparently simple building blocks are extremely complex chemically. In this research, three sorts of artificial cells will be made that grow independently, just as living cells do, before replicating, Simulating cell growth in artificial cells helps us better understand how living cells work.

Taking a shine to industrial catalysts
Dr G.T. (Gareth) Whiting, (m), Utrecht University – Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis
Catalysts and their rational design are vitally important for improving the production efficiency of many of our everyday needs, such as transportation fuels and chemicals. This project aims to use advanced tools to understand processes in industrial-scale catalysts in detail. This will shed light on how to improve their design.

Real-Time Studies at the Nanoscale of the Liquid-Phase Synthesis of Zeolite-Based Catalysts
Dr J. (Jovana) Zecevic (f), Utrecht University - Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis
The creation of improved and new catalysts is necessary to obtain more and higher quality fuels. To find out what occurs when catalysts are being created, researchers want to make the first real-time observations of process at the nanometric scale.

Physical Sciences

Energetics of Galaxy Clusters: Toward a new picture of cosmic structure formation history
Dr H. (Hiroki) Akamatsu (m), SRON
My objective is to work at the boundaries of X-ray astronomy. I will do this with astronomical observations made with the Japanese Astro-H satellite and by contributing to the technology that makes a better instrument possible in ESA's Athena satellite.

The time is now: Timing Verification for Safety-Critical Multi-Cores
Dr S.J.A. (Sebastian) Altmeyer (m), University of Amsterdam – Informatics Institute
Safety-critical computer systems embedded into cars or aircraft must work correctly, as a single failure or a wrong timing may have catastrophic consequences and cost lives. The aim of this research is to guarantee the correct timing behaviour of such safety-critical systems for modern processor architectures by devising new mathematical models and tools.

Mapping the Accretion Processes that Form the Universe's Most Rapidly Rotating Stars
Dr A.M. (Anne) Archibald (f), University of Amsterdam - Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy
By transferring matter from an accompanying star, some stars - the so-called “millisecond pulsars" - rotate hundreds of times each second. The details of this process are not understood precisely. Using radiotelescopes, optical telescopes, X-ray telescopes and gamma telescopes, I will search for the origin of such systems.

The Inventory of Large Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks
Dr A. (Alessandra) Candian (f), Leiden University – Leiden Observatory
What are the key ingredients for the evolution of life on planets? Are these ingredients already available in regions where planet will form? I will investigate these questions modelling the life and death of large and smaller carbon-based molecules in space.

Numerical analysis of non-linear stochastic partial differential equations
Dr S.G. (Sonja) Cox (f), University of Amsterdam - Korteweg-de Vries Institute for Mathematics
Many processes in science are described by (non-linear) stochastic partial differential equations. No explicit solutions exist to these equations. That is why numerical approaches are required to gain insight into the underlying process. The objective of my research is to show that such approaches can be made in an efficient manner.

New Frontiers in Lattice Design
Dr D.N. (Daniel) Dadush (m), CWI - Theoretical Computer Science
Lattices, i.e. regular spatial arrangements of points, have many applications. For instance, wireless mobile phone messages use noise- tolerant lattice encodings and internet communications can be secured by hiding messages within high-dimensional lattices. In this proposal, computer scientists will design new cutting-edge methods for efficiently utilising lattice structure in such applications.

Observing the Universe at the longest wavelengths
Dr F. (Francesco) de Gasperin (m), Leiden University – Leiden Observatory
Clusters of galaxies are the farthest and most massive structures in the universe. To visualise the characteristics of clusters and gain a better understanding of their causal history, the proposed project will use LOFAR, ''the Low Frequency Array'', a revolutionary new European radio telescope developed in the Netherlands.

Deformations in Poisson geometry
Dr I.T. (Ioan) Marcut (m), Radboud University Nijmegen - IMAPP
How objects can be deformed and what limits their deformation is fundamental to geometry. A sheet of paper can take many forms, but not the surface of a sphere. This project will study deformations in Poisson geometry, the mathematical language of classical mechanics.

What & Where: Learning Visual Representations of Concepts in Context
Dr T.E.J. (Thomas) Mensink (m), University of Amsterdam – Informatics Institute
Each day, millions of photos are made. To index, classify and analyse them automatically, the photos must be translated into a language understandable to humans. This proposal will investigate combinations and relationships among various objects, scenes and persons in an image in order to generate understandable translations.

Revisiting the Foundations of Cutting Planes: Bringing Theory Closer to Practice
Dr M. (Marco) Molinaro (m), Delft University of Technology – Department of Applied Mathematics
Mixed-Integer Linear Programming (MILP) is a widely used tool for decision-making with huge economic and societal impact. Here I propose methods for improving the efficiency of solving MILPs, which has the potential of increasing the applicability and accuracy of the models used in several areas.

Capturing the Laws of Data Nature
Dr H.F. (Hannes) Mühleisen (m), CWI - Database Architectures Group
The Big Data Analysis process can be improved and accelerated considerably if a Data Management System makes statistical and analytical models paramount. The scientific challenge is to use these models as a replacement for data storage and to answer queries with sufficient guarantees of precision.

Making mathematical sense of large networks
Dr G. (Guus) Regts, (m), University of Amsterdam – Mathematics
Researchers have developed the concept of graph limits so that they can analyse very large networks such as Facebook and the Internet itself using mathematics. In this project, I will study graph limits based on models from statistical mechanics.

Less confusion from dynamic information
Dr K.A.B. (Kevin) Verbeek (m), Eindhoven University of Technology – Mathematics and Computer Science
A good illustration of how dynamic information changes requires that small changes in the data must result in small changes in the illustration. However, there is no suitable theory for that sort of stable algorithm. The researcher will study the theoretical aspects of stable algorithms and apply these to practical problems.

Humanities

Descartes Put to the Test. Voices of dissent in the Golden Age
Dr H.T. (Han Thomas) Adriaenssen (m), University of Groningen – Philosophy
In the 17th century, Descartes and his followers broke away from the mediaeval worldview. But their attempts to innovate were constantly put to the test by conservative thinkers. This project studies how they formulated challenges for new theories and, by doing this, made an important contribution to philosophical developments in the Golden Age

Speech perception driven by context
Dr M. (Martijn) Baart (m), Tilburg University – Linguistics
The context within which we perceive speech helps us to interpret the sounds correctly. This research focuses on the interplay between our lexicon (the storehouse of existing words), our capacity to read lips (the interpretation of the speaker's moving mouth) and semantics (our knowledge of words' meanings) during speech perception.

The surrealistic Middle Ages
Dr T.M. (Tessel) Bauduin (f), Radboud University Nijmegen – Art History and Architecture
Throughout the previous century, the Middle Ages were repeatedly rediscovered, also by surrealists such as Dalí. This project will study how and why the surrealists valued mediaeval art such as that of Hieronymus Bosch, and used it to present themselves as being new and modern.

Unravelling Homer's Language
Dr L.C. (Lucien) van Beek (m), Leiden University – Linguistics
Homer, the oldest Greek poet, composed his epic stories in an artificial language. According to linguists, this language arose as a mixture of many Greek dialects. This project will analyse the provenance of apparent dialect forms using a new model of language evolution and in this way seeks to demonstrate that Homer used only one dialect.

Strange? Narrators in Contemporary Fiction: Towards a Cognitive Reception Theory
Dr M. (Marco) Caracciolo (m), University of Groningen – Literary and Cultural Studies
Why do we value novels narrated by a psychopath? This project studies how contemporary readers deal with the “unusualness" of this type of narrator; it identifies a wide range of interpretive strategies the readers use in dealing with the cognitive and ethical distance between themselves and the fictitious characters.

Why do some epidemic diseases lead to hatred? An investigation into the impact of economic inequality on the extent of blame, persecution, hatred, and violence after early modern plagues in the Northern Low Countries
Dr D.R.C. (Daniel) Curtis (m), Utrecht University – History
Epidemics throughout history have led to hatred and fear: from the Black Death and cholera to HIV/AIDS and Ebola. However, epidemic disease could also act as a cohesive force for communities. This project investigates the reasons behind divergent social responses by focusing on plague in the early modern Low Countries.

Paths through slavery: urban slave agency and empowerment in Suriname, 1700-1863
Dr K.J. (Karwan) Fatah-Black (m), Leiden University – History
Despite severely inhumane conditions, some slave families in Paramaribo were able to improve their fate on their own. Often, historians only have an eye for plantation slavery and large-scale resistance. This projects highlights how primarily female
slaves in the city found a road to freedom for themselves and their families by means of personal relationships, trade and even court cases.

Reading between the lines: identifying implicit perspectives through linguistic analyses
Dr A.S. (Antske) Fokkens (f), VU University Amsterdam – Linguistics
How information is displayed can influence our perception. Researchers use automatic text analysis to discover how various sources describe people. Which characteristics and deeds are often stated together? How can scientists from other disciplines use this information to study perception?

Poets and Profits: A New History of Dutch Literary Authorship 1550-1750
Dr N. (Nina) Geerdink (f), Radboud University Nijmegen – Literary and Cultural Studies
The literary elite usually looks at the authors of bestsellers with misgivings. In early modern times, this was no different: authors with literary ambitions stated with pride that they did it for the honour, not for the money. This study will burst the balloon of that attitude and demonstrate, on the contrary, the earning opportunities for early modern Dutch authors.

The language of modernity: Vernacular Malay in pre-independence Indonesia
Dr T.G. (Tom) Hoogervorst (m), KITLV – Literary and Cultural Studies
This project studies the vernacular of the urban middle class in the Dutch East Indies - the so-called "low-Malayan". Non-Europeans used this language to write about themselves and the world they lived in. I will analyse a recently digitised corpus of books and newspapers and demonstrate how the study of language provides new insights into daily life in a multicultural society.

Experience and Design: The Emergence of Architectural Experience in Paris and London, 1750-1815
Dr S.D. (Sigrid) de Jong (f), Leiden University - Art History and Architecture
How you experience a building with your entire body and all of your senses was first expressed in the 18th century. This project investigates which guiding role the experience of architecture will play in descriptions, theories and design practice in two of the most important cultural centres of that period: Paris and London.

Seeing is believing: Female Muslim leadership and visual communication in Southeast Asia
Dr D. (David) Kloos (m), KITLV – Area studies
Female Muslim leaders are becoming increasingly important. Research in this area is generally limited to the role of women in the written Islamic tradition. This project investigates how female leaders in Southeast Asia use visual images and how they use these to challenge dominant gender relationships within Islam.

Young connected migrants. Comparing digital practices of young asylum seekers and expatriates in the Netherlands
Dr K.H.A. (Koen) Leurs (m), Utrecht University – Media studies
Young asylum seekers and expatriates have digital contact with their home countries and countries of residence. I will compare the experiences of young Somalians, Syrians, Americans and Indians in the Netherlands to determine whether Internet use leads to segregation or integration. The research comprises interviews, on-line and off-line observations and analyses smartphones as a pocket archive with meaningful photos.

Landscapes of war in Roman literature
Dr B.L. (Bettina) Reitz-Joosse (f) Literary and Cultural Studies
'Veni, vidi, vici,' Caesar said: 'I came, I saw, I conquered.' But how did the other Romans view all those wars? I will show how Roman writers derived meaning from the battlefields and in that way contributed to the formation of social thinking concerning man, violence and nature.

Learning the language of predictions
Dr J.C. (Jacolien) Van Rij-Tange (f), University of Groningen – Linguistics
What pronouns such as “he" or “she" refer to, changes from sentence to sentence. This project applies the learning theory of Rescorla and Wagner to the acquisition of pronouns. The central idea behind this theory is that children learn from incorrect predictions. The project will combine experiments, corpus research and computational modelling.

Addressing Ethical Challenges of the Service Robot Revolution
Dr A. (Aimee) Robbins-van Wynsberghe (f), University of Twente – Philosophy
The 21st century is predicted to be the century of service robots. Given that design choices impact both the good and bad outcomes of robots, we must ask: Is ethics taken into account in their development and implementation? This Veni project will build a new
ethical approach to address the development and implementation of service robots.

Nudging Responsibly. The Impact of Choice Architecture on Responsibility Attributions
Dr P.J. (Philip) Robichaud (m), Delft University of Technology – Philosophy
"Nudges" are signals that are embedded in one's selection environment and that result in predictable effects on behaviour. Do people deserve blame if they foment evil and praise if they achieve a given good? This project develops theories that address this question and that form a basis for guidelines for ethically responsible “nudging".

Between local debts and global markets: Explaining slavery in South and Southeast Asia, 1600-1800
Dr M. (Matthias) van Rossum (m), International Institute of Social History – History
The Dutch history of slavery is often viewed from an Atlantic perspective. Due to this, the large-scale history of slavery in Asia remains underrepresented. This project will demonstrate that the traditional image of “mild" and “non-economic" slavery does not apply to the vast VOC area and, using VOC archives, will study how slave labour was used for production for world markets.

Occasionalism and the secularisation of early modern science: Understanding the dismissal of divine action during the scientific revolution
Dr A. (Andrea) Sangiacomo (m), University of Groningen – Philosophy
Science was still theology based in the 17th century; in the 18th century, this was apparently no longer the case. Why did this change take place? This project will study how the secularisation of science was encouraged by the responses of a few natural philosophers to the “occasionalistic" idea that God intervenes continuously in nature.

Fields of opportunity: crop cultivation in Northwestern Europe's coastal salt marshes, 600 BC to 800 AD
Dr M. (Mans) Schepers (m), University of Groningen – Archaeology
Many archaeologists think that crop cultivation in wet areas was problematic. Nonetheless, crop cultivation layers have been encountered in excavations in the area of terp villages, along with a broad range of crops. Using plant remains from this salt marsh area, combined with experimental research, this project will show that crop cultivation is possible here without land reclamation.

The web that was
Dr M. (Michael) Stevenson (m), University of Groningen – Media Studies
Facebook, Google, YouTube: we use the web every day but know very little about how it has developed. This research analyses the history of the web using the Perl programming language. It provides insight into the economic, cultural and technological developments of the historical web and, with this, provides input for the development of the future web.

The history of the measurable me
Dr F. (Fenneke) Sysling (f), Utrecht University – History
Since the 19th century, people have measured their bodies in order to learn more about themselves. This research shows how people appropriated this quantification from science and applied it at the individual level and how this has formed our identity.

Gestures and face
Dr C.L.G. (Connie) de Vos (f), Radboud University Nijmegen/Max Planck Insitute – Linguistics
In spontaneous conversations, sign language users use not only their hands but also their body movements and facial expressions. With a comparison of Dutch sign language and the new sign language of Kata Kolok, the origin and functions of these facial expressions can be determined. This research annotates and analyses recordings of spontaneous sign language conversations.

Gendering Sacred Space: Female Networks, Patronage, and Ritual Experience in Early Christian Pilgrimage
Dr E. S. (Marlena) Whiting (f), University of Amsterdam – Archaeology
Many of the earliest Christian pilgrims to the Holy Land were women. Their stories survive to this day, but scholars so far have not considered how their gender shaped their experiences. This project will investigate how women performed pilgrimage and experienced their encounters with the sacred in the Early Christian centuries.

Where Helen of Troy lived: reconstructing the urbanisation of the Mycenaean town at Ayios Vasilios
Dr C.W. (Corien) Wiersma (f), University of Groningen – Archaeology
In Greece (Ayios Vasilios), remains have been found of the palace of King Menelaeus and the beautiful Helen. The urbanisation process of the palatial settlement will be investigated by means of geophysics and a field survey. The results will be used to study the rise of the Bronze Age palace-states and for the protection of the area of discovery.

Social Sciences

Transatlantic trade and investment partnership' (TTIP): The de-democratisation of European market regulation?
Dr M. (Marija) Bartl (f), University of Amsterdam - Centre for the Study of European Contract Law
By analysing the TTIP within the context of de-democratisation outside the State, this project will survey the democratic influences of TTIP institutions and offers practical solutions for the minimisation of its negative effects.

Why do you read better than I do?
Dr E. (Elsje) van Bergen (f), VU University Amsterdam- Faculty of Psychology and Education
Children differ greatly in how well they read. A behavioural geneticist will unravel the question of which interplay between genes and environment is responsible for this. Is reading ability as simple as: like parent like child? And if so, does this come from the genes that the parents pass on or from the environment that the parents create?

Rewards: from brain to business
Dr E. (Erik) Bijleveld (m), Radboud University Nijmegen – Behavioural Science Institute
People often get the best out of themselves in places where there is lots to be gained. But not always: sometimes rewards end up yielding poorer performance. This project looks at the influence of rewards on information processing in the cerebral cortex. This will make clearer the conditions under which rewards (do not) improve human performance.

Differences in remuneration among professions
Dr T. (Thijs) Bol (m), University of Amsterdam ‒ Sociology
Wage inequality has increased in recent decades in many Western countries. Research shows that this increase can be explained primarily by an increasing disparity in wages among professions. This project investigates why some professions become increasingly lucrative, while wages in other professions remain the same or decrease.

Inequality in education and parents' socio-spatial strategies
Dr W.R. (Willem) Boterman (m), University of Amsterdam - Urban Geography/Urban Studies
Which social and spatial strategies do parents use in order to gain access to good elementary schools? This study investigates the relationship between neighbourhood and school choice in Dutch cities and how this differs among highly educated, less educated, foreign and native parents.

Modelling decision-making in antisocial and psychopathic offenders
Dr I.A. (Inti) Brazil (m), Radboud University Nijmegen - Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour
There are many violent patients with extremely antisocial personality styles and/or psychopathologies in clinics for those detained under a hospital order. These patients respond poorly to current forms of treatment and continue to make bad choices. In this project, a decision-making model will be used to determine why these patients make poor choices, so that specially adapted methods of treatment can be developed.

The role of expectations in economic models
Dr J. R. (Jochem) de Bresser (m), University of Groningen – Economics, Econometrics and Finance
Expectations about wages, health and life span play a central role in economic models for the supply of labour and the propensity to save. However, economists have approached these expectations to date with their own predictions on the basis of available information. In this research, I will enrich economic models with the actual expectations that people cherish.

Facing Tinnitus: A fear-conditioning approach to chronic tinnitus suffering
Dr R.F.F. (Rilana) Cima (f), Maastricht University – Audiology
Tinnitus (ringing in the ears), the constant perception of a phantom noise, can hinder patients so much that the quality of their lives is severely affected. The primary objective of my project is to test the less-obvious proposition that it is not the tinnitus noise itself, but instead fears and misinterpretations related to tinnitus, that explain the persistent tinnitus symptoms.

A job in welfare?
Dr A. (Anja) Eleveld (f), VU University Amsterdam- Social Law
Welfare recipients who are obliged perform labour without wages are subject to the authority of a manager - just like regular employees - but they are not always protected by regular labour law. This project will investigate whether and how a supervisor's authority can be limited by external regulation.

Facing Europe: The personalisation of European Union politics in news coverage and its consequences for democracy
Dr K. (Katjana) Gattermann (f), University of Amsterdam - Social and Behavioural Sciences
Can the personalisation of politics in the news media foster the relationship between politicians and citizens in the European Union? This project will investigate developments in the personalisation of news items in the press in six European Member States and how this influences the knowledge and attitudes of citizens towards the EU.

Can peers make youth sick?
Dr M. (Matteo) Giletta (m), Tilburg University – Developmental Psychology
Among youth, experiences of social isolation and rejection can have particularly deleterious and long-lasting effects on well-being. How could this be? This research will clarify this question, by investigating whether negative peer experiences alter the functioning of the immune system. Additionally, it will examine how these effects could be prevented.

Too 'fat' to eat
Dr K.A. (Klaske) Glashouwer (f), University of Groningen – Clinical Psychology
Anorexia nervosa patients eat too little and are often dissatisfied with their bodies. I will investigate a new method of treatment for dysmorphia among people with anorexia. On the basis of this, I will test whether and how dissatisfaction with one's body leads to food restriction.

Jurisprudence under a magnifying glass: can transparency contribute to legitimacy?
Dr S.G. (Stephan) Grimmelikhuijsen (m), Utrecht University – Utrecht School of Governance
Transparency should lead to more support among citizens for the law. However, critics are of the opinion that transparency makes the law more vulnerable to simple criticism: this may actually cause a decrease in legitimacy. In this project, I study whether, how and why transparency contributes to the perceived legitimacy of the law.

Alcohol on Social Network Sites
Dr H (Hanneke) Hendriks (f), Leiden University - Social and Organisational Psychology
This project investigates how often and why adolescents talk about alcohol on Social Network Sites (SNS), along with the effects of various statements about alcohol on SNS on alcohol consumption, and why and when these effects occur. An intervention plan will then be developed and tested to counter the harmful effects of alcohol-related statements on SNS.

Learning to identify risks of new technologies
Dr J. (Jarno) Hoekman (m), Utrecht University - Innovation Studies
Innovations provide solutions to societal problems, but also introduce new risks to health and the environment. The researcher focuses on pharmaceutical innovations and studies how governments, businesses, doctors and patients learn to discover the side effects of medicines. In this manner, he contributes to efficient decision-making and safe treatment.

The daily governance of transit migration in Turkey at European Union borders: the Europeanisation of Turkish border and migration governance
Dr B. (Beste) Isleyen (f), University of Amsterdam – Political Science
What is the influence of the EU migration regime on Turkish risk perceptions regarding transit migration? What are the effects on the physical control of borders and border crossing in Turkey? How does EU migration policy affect the mobility decisions of the migrants using Turkey as a transit country? New insights into the impact of the EU migration regime on the everyday management of borders and migration in Turkey will be offered.

The impact of expression modalities - speaking versus manual activities - on decision making
Dr A.K. (Anne-Kathrin) Klesse (f), Tilburg University - Tilburg School of Economics and Management
This proposal compares expression modalities— speaking versus manual activities— on decision making. I predict, for instance, that speaking triggers more impulsive decisions and reduces individuals’ tendency to save money. The ultimate goal is to understand differences between these expression modalities and to derive managerial implications and public policy recommendations.

The care and development of public value
Dr E. (Eva) Knies (f), Utrecht University – Public Administration and Organisational Science
The requirements placed on the quality of care and education are changing. This study inventories what constitutes good provision of service in nursing homes and schools according to those involved (users, employees, managers), and how this can be achieved.

Focus on itching
Dr A.I.M. (Antoinette) van Laarhoven (f), Leiden University – Health, Medical and Neuropsychology
Itching is difficult to ignore and there are no effective treatments for chronic itching. Attention plays an important role in chronic pain; this has barely been investigated for itching. This research project will compare the attention processes for itching and for pain, and the capabilities for changing attention processes in both healthy people and in patients.

The strategic dimension of preferences
Dr M.P (Maël) Lebreton, University of Amsterdam – Brain & Cognition and Amsterdam Business School
Economists use binary choices to understand people’s preferences. This project will investigate how participants’ choices in such setting not only depend on their core preferences, but also on strategies developed to choose quickly and efficiently.

Smoking, a habit under development
Dr M. (Maartje) Luijten (f), Radboud University Nijmegen – Behavioural Science Institute
Unhealthy habits such as smoking are associated with health risks. Our brain's functioning can cause differences in the degree to which new habits are adopted. In this project, the development of smoking as a habitual behaviour among high-risk youth will be studied using brain research.

Bayesian approach to cognitive process models of response inhibition
Dr D. (Dora) Matzke (f), University of Amsterdam – Social and Behavioural Sciences, Psychology, Psychological Methodology
Which cognitive processes play a role in interrupting - inhibiting - an activity that has already been started? The goal of this project is to develop a framework for process models of response inhibition that provide scientists with the possibility to evaluate the relative contributions of cognitive processes to response inhibition on the basis of Bayesian model selection.

A better understanding of labour exploitation
Dr M.J. (Masja) van Meeteren (f), Leiden University - Criminology
Since labour exploitation has been criminalised as human trafficking, new cases arise regularly. However, it is unclear exactly how labour exploitation comes about. Which types of labour exploitation exist and how can these be understood? These questions will be answered using a newly developed research approach that focuses on both victims and employers.

Is that your telephone?
Dr M. (Michelle) Moerel (f), Maastricht University – Cognitive Neuroscience
Our daily environment is full of noise. Using strong MRI scanners, this project will investigate how the flexibility in that portion of our brain that processes sounds allows us to recognise and understand the relevant sounds - such as the sound of your own telephone.

Psychological measurement procedures for responses and response times
Dr D. (Dylan) Molenaar (m), University of Amsterdam – Psychology
Statements about psychological characteristics such as intelligence are based on the answers that respondents give to test questions. In this project, suitable procedures will be developed that - in addition to the answers - also take the response times to questions into account in order to give a verdict on the psychological differences between and within people.

Better Science Through Better Crowdsourcing
Dr G.P. (Gabriele) Paolacci (m), Erasmus University Rotterdam - Marketing Management
Crowdsourcing is revolutionising how social scientists conduct research. However, little is known about the scientific perils of recruiting research participants on online marketplaces. This project will investigate how research data quality depends on characteristics of the crowdsourcing process that are relevant across research paradigms and platforms.

Genetics for economists
Dr C.A. (Niels) Rietveld (m), Erasmus University Rotterdam - School of Economics
Many socioeconomic characteristics, such as one's position in the labour market and educational level, are partially hereditary. This project looks for the genes that are related to these characteristics, whether these genes influence various socioeconomic characteristics simultaneously, and analyses whether people who are genetically different respond differently to policy measures.

Encouraging creativity, even when things are not going your way
Dr M. (Marieke) Roskes (f), Utrecht University – Social and Organisational Psychology
People who fear failure often set to work carefully and systematically. Combined with fear of failure, this makes it difficult to come up with creative ideas, while these can then indeed be very useful. This research tests interventions for encouraging creativity, even in the face of obstacles.

Race against the robot?
Dr A.M. (Anna) Salomons (f), Utrecht University – Economics
Technological progress is the engine of our economic growth, but it also requires important adaptations to our society. This project will study the effects of the Digital Revolution on the labour markets, such as those resulting from automation by robots and other digital technologies. These effects will be both theoretically modelled and empirically assessed.

Econometric methods for assessing non-standard monetary policy impacts
Dr J. (Julia) Schaumburg (f), VU University Amsterdam - Econometrics
The global financial crisis has triggered monetary interventions and tighter financial regulation. But does the impact of such measures last or does it evaporate quickly? And do they lead to the desired outcomes? These questions are addressed, using flexible, newly developed econometric methods.

Personal preferences in on-line health communication
Dr E.S. (Eline) Smit (f), University of Amsterdam - Communication Science
Using online messages about health, people can improve their lifestyles in order to prevent chronic diseases. However, not everyone wants to have such messages presented in the same way. The investigation will determine how the presentation of online health messages can best be aligned to people's personal preferences.

The Islamic Faith and Democratic Support in the Middle East
Dr C.H.B.M. (Niels) Spierings (m), Radboud University Nijmegen - Sociology
Are strong believers in Islam in the Middle East less democratic? This research will demonstrate whether and how religious convictions truly undermine or sometimes foster democratisation. Particular attention will be paid to the political role and repression of Islam.

Spreading Fertile Ideas - Social Network Influences on Having Children
Dr G. (Gert) Stulp (m), University of Groningen - Sociology
The significant decrease in the number of births in the 20th century might be explained in part by the influence of social interactions. The proposal aims for long-term data collection of networks and child choices in two populations with strongly differing birth rates. Recently developed analysis methods will be used to demonstrate possible network influences on child choice.

The art of persuasion
Dr S. (Susanne) Täuber (f), University of Groningen - Human Resource Management & Organisational Behaviour
It is important to convince people to live healthy lives, but what if well-intentioned efforts work adversely? If being healthy is seen as a moral obligation, this may lead to defensive behaviour. I will research the effects of moral judgement on the self-reliant participatory society that we strive for.

Neighbours from hell: between eviction and a solution to residential nuisance
Dr M. (Michel) Vols (m), University of Groningen – Law
Many people experience residential nuisance. Landlords and judges try to tackle the nuisance by means of eviction. This is not solution-oriented. Eviction can only take place in a late phase; it is also expensive and only shifts the problem. In this project, an alternative approach will be developed in which victims are helped earlier and those causing nuisance do not become homeless.

More equality for foreigners?
Dr K.M. (Karin) de Vries (f), VU University Amsterdam – Constitutional and Administrative Law
Does the law protect foreigners from unequal treatment on the basis of their nationality? Or are they outsiders to whom the right to equal treatment does not apply? This research project investigates the role of nationality in non-discrimination law.

Enacting the Coal Enclave: Corporate Sovereignty in Central Mozambique
Dr N. (Nikkie) Wiegink (f), Utrecht University - Cultural Anthropology
Transnational companies are viewed as a sustainable alternative to development aid, but at the same time they would appear to weaken the role of the state. This ethnographic study in and around a coal mine in Mozambique questions how these dynamics contribute to the sovereign position of transnational companies in marginal areas of resource-rich nations.

Physical Sciences

Aperiodic Mechanical Metamaterials: Bridging the Gap between Matter and Machine
Dr C.C. (Corentin) Coulais (m), AMOLF - Physics
Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures with extraordinary properties. Since they often have a periodical structure, their capabilities are limited. This project will develop metamaterials with complex mechanical functions using aperiodic structures.

Taking Pictures of Free-flying Electrons
Dr J. (Johannes) Jobst (m) Leiden University – Physics
In graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms, electrons travel large distances without changing direction. The researcher will use a novel microscopy technique to study how these free-flying electrons behave when the devices are switched on and off.

Magnets out of the comfort zone
J.H. (Johan) Mentink (m) Radboud University Nijmegen – Physics
Magnetism occurs due to the interactions between electrons. The researchers want to understand how quickly magnets can be manipulated using the ultrafast dynamics of electrons' charge and angular momentum; for this they will develop a non-equilibrium quantum theory.

Design of 2-dimensional soft materials
Dr L. (Laura) Rossi (f), University of Amsterdam - Physics
Despite their importance in science and technology, 2D materials are difficult to study directly at the atomic scale. The researchers will assemble smart micron-size particles into directionally bonded 2D structures mimicking atomic systems, allowing observation of single particle behaviours.

Heart of Darkness: dark matter illuminated
Dr J. (Jordy) de Vries (m) FOM-Nikhef – Physics
Strong indications exist that our universe consists partially of dark matter. This research develops new theoretical methods for describing collisions between dark matter and atomic nuclei. The purpose is to unravel the mysterious nature of dark matter.

Towards realistic predictions for new physics searches at the LHC
Dr L. (Lisa) Zeune (f), FOM-Nikhef – Physics
What is the universe made of? What is dark matter? The Large Hadron Collider will answer these questions by searching for new physics. This quest is possible only with realistic and precise theoretical predictions for new physics processes. These will be made in this project.

Technology Foundation STW

Cell mechanics for regenerative medicine
Dr B.I. (Bakiye) Avci (f), AMC – Biomedical Engineering & Physics
This project will develop a non-invasive measurement technique based on optical coherence tomography and the principles of vibrography for the evaluation of the quality of egg cells and pre-implantation embryos using acoustic forces. The ultimate objective is to increase the success rate for IVF treatment.

Soft yet safe
Dr B.W. (Bas) Borsje (m), University of Twente – Civil Engineering
Construction using nature is a promising method of coastal protection that contributes to making our coastline climate-proof and facilitates the coastal zone's economic development. This research will study the stability of tidal marshes during storm conditions; this knowledge will help us design soft foreshores.

Risky blood vessels - MRI sees what we can't see
Dr B.F. (Bram) Coolen (m), AMC – Radiology
The risk of a cerebral infarction is strongly determined by the degree of arterial inflammation throughout the entire vascular system between the heart and the head. In this project, the researcher will develop new MRI technology with which the degree of inflammation of the vascular wall can be measured precisely in a single scan session of the carotid artery, aorta and cerebral blood vessels.

On target: MRI-driven radiotherapy for moving tumours
Dr S.P.M. (Sjoerd) Crijns (m), University Medical Center Utrecht – Radiotherapy
The integrated MRI/accelerator introduces possibilities for significant increases in the precision of radiotherapy for cancer patients. In this study, new MRI methods will be developed that form the basis for motion corrections during the treatment of tumours that move - due to breathing, for example.

Investigating the geochemical and electrochemical controls on the formation, stability, and arsenic uptake mechanism of mixed valent Fe(II,III) phases generated by Fe(0) electrocoagulation
Dr C.M.V.G. (Case) van Genuchten (m), Utrecht University - Geochemistry
Researchers will investigate the formation, stability, and arsenic removal efficiency of unique Fe(II,III) minerals generated by Fe(0) electrocoagulation (EC), which is a novel, low-cost arsenic treatment technology. This research can lead to technological breakthroughs that dramatically increase the likelihood of sustained EC system operations in poor arsenic-affected rural communities.

Intelligent building blocks for good healing
Dr J. (Jeroen) Leijten (m), University of Twente – MIRA
Every tissue in our body is built of small functional units. In this project, the researcher will fabricate various small functional units. These units will be used as building blocks to make complex tissues. These complex tissues can be used as a replacement for worn, damaged or lost organs.

The PERKs of being resistant? On the exploitation of a novel source of nematode resistance in vegetable crops
Dr J.L. (Jose) Lozano Torres (m), Wageningen University - Plant Sciences
Specific resistances that are often used in agricultural crops are increasingly losing their effectiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes. This forces the plant breeding sector to develop source material with alternative forms of resistance - something that is as yet unexplored territory. This project is focused on the exploitation of plant tissues' basic immune responses to the microscopically small injuries caused by invasive nematodes.

Nano-medicinal treatment and diagnostic testing for prostate cancer
Dr R. (Roy) van der Meel (m), University Medical Center Utrecht Laboratory for Clinical Chemistry and Haematology
Worldwide, prostate cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer among men. The objective of this research is to develop a tumour-focused nano-medicinal treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer, supported by an accompanying diagnostic test based on small cell membrane vesicles from blood and urine samples.

Fly-bond: more efficient lightweight aircraft structures
Dr S. (Sofia) Teixeira de Freitas (f), Delft University of Technology
Would you be afraid to fly in a bonded aircraft? This Veni project will contribute for the acceptance of bonded joints in composite aircraft. Why? It is one of the key strategies to build more efficient composite aircraft and reduce transportation carbon footprint.

Rethinking Energy Harvesting for MEMS (REH-MEMS): High Performance at Random Slow Motion
Dr N. (Nima) Tolou (m), Delft University of Technology - Precision and Microsystems Engineering (PME)
By the year 2020, more than 20 billion low-voltage, wireless electric devices will need a battery. The objective of REH-MEMS is to breach this limitation by harvesting energy efficiently from daily motions to provide these micro-devices with power so that they can perform without a battery throughout their entire lifespan.

New role for receptors in cancer
Dr G.J.P. (Gerard) van Westen (m), Leiden University – LACDR/Cluster Drug & Target Discovery
Death from cancer is one of the most important causes of death in the Netherlands. Research reveals that so-called receptors are often present in cancer tissues in an altered form. Receptors are the most important class of “target proteins" that medicines attach to in other forms of disease. In this “computational" project, the role of receptors in cancer growth will be studied and utilised.

Controlling recombination: New strategies for reverse breeding
Dr T.G. (Erik) Wijnker (m), Wageningen University – Plant Sciences
New breeds of plants are created by crossing plants and selecting plants possessing new combinations of characteristics from among the progeny. This research will search in a targeted way for new, fast and efficient ways of gaining control over the largely coincidental process of the inheritance of properties. More efficient plant breeding is the goal.

Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMw)

The aetiology and result of affective psychosis caused by childbirth
Dr V. (Veerle) Bergink (f), Erasmus MC - Psychiatry
After giving birth, women run a high risk of mania or psychosis. This project studies what occurs in the brain structure and activity during this period. We then research whether we can predict which women will suffer a manic depressive recurrence and which women will have a favourable progression of the disease.

Get rid of that itch!
Dr E.H.J. (Ellen) van den Bogaard (f), Radboudumc – Dermatology
Eczema patients are distracted by itching every day. Or, better said: it keeps them from a normal daily life. By developing complex 3D models of the skin, the researchers will study whether the cells and molecules involved in itching can be inhibited. With this knowledge, focussed therapies for itching can be developed.

Do intestinal bacteria increase the risk of intestinal cancer in patients with ulcerative colitis?
Dr J.M. (Annemarie) Boleij (f), Radboudumc - Pathology
Toxic intestinal bacteria possibly increase the risk of colon cancer in patients with infectious intestinal diseases (ulcerative colitis). The researchers will determine whether toxic bacteria can be correlated with intestinal cancer processes in colitis patients with intestinal cancer. The predictive value of these bacteria can be used in the future for the early diagnosis of intestinal cancer.

Stress, steroids and poor vision
Dr C.J.F. (Camiel) Boon (m), Leiden University Medical Center - Ophthalmology
Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is a disease of the eye that occurs relatively frequently and that is associated with the use of corticosteroids and with stress (manager's disease). Little is known about its genesis and treatment possibilities are limited. I will search for genetic factors in CSC, the consequences at the cell level, and for better treatments.

Regulating cannabis factories in psychotic patients
Dr M.G. (Matthijs) Bossong (m), University Medical Center Utrecht – Brain
Our brains contain cannabis factories that play a role in our immune system. In patients with psychosis, these factories do not work well. This research will study how regulating patients' cannabis factories results in better functioning of the immune system and a decrease in psychotic symptoms.

Families as the cornerstone of the rotavirus epidemic
Dr P.C.J.L. (Patricia) Bruijning-Verhagen (f), University Medical Center Utrecht
Young children and their families play a central role in spreading the rotavirus, the most important cause of severe gastroenteritis among children. This research will study the spread of the rotavirus among young families and will determine, based on mathematical models, how vaccination can decrease the spread of rotavirus stomach flu.

Energy metabolism determines the immune system's direction
Dr S. (Shih-Chin) Cheng (m), Radboudumc
Immune cells need energy to function well. I want to research how the immune system's energy condition depends on the type of infection and how energy metabolism affects immunological response. Insight into this may offer possibilities for improving the effects of vaccinations and for reinforcing immunity in case of infections.

Genetic component for clustering of diabetes within families
Dr A.D. (Ayşe) Demirkan (f), Erasmus MC - Epidemiology
Hereditary material received from the same ancestor (consanguinity) can cause recessively inheritable forms of disease. Consanguinity may also be a risk factor for type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). With this proposal, I wish to find the genetic regions received from the same ancestor that increase the risk of T2DM, by using statistical computer models in a large family study.

The relationship between diabetes and arteriosclerosis
Dr J.A. (Janna) van Diepen (f), Radboudumc – Internal Medicine
Why do people with diabetes have an increased risk of arteriosclerosis? The researchers will measure whether (progenitor) cells in the immune system digest more sugars and more rapidly, causing them to become more active and more aggressive, as during an infection. This can cause damage to the arterial wall more quickly, which in turn causes arteriosclerosis.

Analysing ‘big data’ for the improvement of personalised treatment of cancer patients
Dr R. (Rudolf) S.N. Fehrmann (m), University Medical Center Groningen –Oncology
I will search for genetic deviations, genes and biological routes that are responsible for tumour behaviour and therapy response. This will help in the development of new cancer therapies and personalised treatment.

Prevention of diagnostic errors among the aged with a suspicion of a pulmonary embolism.
Dr G.J. (Geert-Jan) Geersing (m), University Medical Center Utrecht - Julius Centrum
Since symptoms among old people are sometimes mild, the occurrence of a pulmonary embolism among them is often missed. Referring everyone for a scan is also unsafe. The results can be unclear, resulting in the unnecessary prescription of blood thinners whereas this presents a danger. The researchers will develop methods to prevent both forms of diagnostic errors.

Repairing defective genes in mini-livers
Dr H. (Helmuth) Gehart (m), Hubrecht Institute
Many liver diseases are caused by faulty DNA sequences in liver genes. Researchers plan to isolate liver stem cells from patients and repair the incorrect sequence in their genome. Subsequently, the team wants to show that the corrected cells can be injected into a damaged liver and repair the organ.

The role of genetic stress in the occurrence of mental retardation
Dr J. (Jayne) Hehir-Kwa (f), Radboudumc - Human Genetics
This research project focuses on the question of how combinations of genetic mutations can lead to intellectual limitation. New genetic and biometric facial information will be used to unravel the impact of genetic mutations on the severity of the intellectual limitation.

The rhythms of the heart
Dr J. (Jordi) Heijman (m), Maastricht University - Cardiology
Heart rhythm disorders are an important cause of death. Calcium ions play a role in the normal electrical activation/contraction of heart muscle cells and in the onset of heart rhythm disorders. In this study, computer models will be developed to determine which calcium-dependent processes have particularly negative consequences. This knowledge will help the development of better treatment methods for heart rhythm disorders in patients.

Encouraging neuronal identity
Dr A. (Ali) Jahanshahianvar (m), Maastricht University – Neuroscience
Deep brain stimulation is a popular therapy for patients with neurological and psychiatric pathologies. However, the effects are not optimal and side effects can occur. I want to improve this therapy by performing research into the recently discovered change in the identity of brain cells caused by electrical stimulation.

Gender differences in the risk profile for atherosclerosis in various blood vessels
Dr M. (Maryam) Kavousi (f), Erasmus MC - Epidemiology
Heart disease and vascular disease are the most important causes of death among both men and women. Hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) is the primary cause for the onset of these diseases. In this project, I will research the extent to which the risk factors, hereditary causes and new biomarkers can explain the difference in hardening of the arteries between men and women.

Teaching immune cells to kill cancer
Dr K. (Helmuth) Gehart (m), Hubrecht Institute
Tumours contain immune cells that can recognise and destroy cancerous cells. However, tumour cells often disguise themselves as normal cells to escape this destruction. The researcher aims to develop a method to culture mini-tumours (‘organoids’) with immune cells to screen for new factors stimulating tumour destruction by immune cells.

Increased risk of obstructed coronary arteries in the case of blood clotting disorders
Dr B.K. (Khan) Mahmoodi (m), University Medical Center Groningen / St. Antonius Ziekenhuis Nieuwegein - Cardiology
The researcher presumes that genetically reinforced blood clotting, which increases the risk of the formation of clots in veins, also plays an important role in the occurrence of heart attacks and the obstruction of diversions in the coronary arteries.

The earlier the better - focusing on mitochondrial ROS as an early intervention in systemic sclerosis
Dr W. (Wioleta) Marut (f), University Medical Center Utrecht - Immunology
The researchers will study how the lack of oxygen initiates a process that results in the development of systematic sclerosis. A better understanding of this process will lead to the development of new medication and improved healthcare for these patients.

Combining statistics and clinics for better patient care
Dr M.M. (Mostafa) Mokhles (m), Erasmus MC – Thoracic Surgery
These days, patients can live to adulthood with a congenital heart defect. Unfortunately, they must undergo several heart operations throughout their lives. This project will develop predictive methods to determine the optimum moment for each required heart operation so that the total number of heart operations throughout the lives of these patients can be minimised.

How mistakes in DNA lead to infections
Dr P.A (Pauline) van Schouwenburg (f), Erasmus MC – Immunology
Our immune system protects us from infections. Some people's immune systems do not work well, causing them to be extra vulnerable to infections. The researchers will examine the DNA of patients to see if they can discover 'errors' that cause a poor functioning of their immune systems, as a result of which these patients suffer from a disease called CVID.

Fewer cases of severe congenital cardiac arrhythmia?
Dr A.J.M. (Anke) Tijsen (f), AMC – Cardiology
In hereditary cardiac arrhythmia, not all patients with the same mutation (change in the genetic material) have the same severity of the disorder. The researchers want to find out whether additional variations in the sick gene can explain this difference. On the basis of these additional variants, they will try to develop a new therapy for this heart rhythm disorder.

Bacteria irritate your lungs' nerves
Dr M.A.D. (Marieke) van Zoelen (f), University Medical Center Utrecht - Immunology
Bacterial pulmonary septicaemia is a life-threatening infectious disease. The researchers will study the lung's infection reflex by establishing how nerve endings in the lungs recognise bacteria and then inhibit the damaging lung infection and, finally, how this can be used as a handhold for a new treatment strategy in the fight against pulmonary septicaemia. 

Interdivisional

Is the selection behaviour of patients predictable?
Dr E.W. (Esther) de Bekker-Grob (f), Erasmus MC – Public Health
Obtaining insight into patients' preferences is for reaching optimal clinical and policy decisions. This research project will establish how well the preferences patients say they have correspond with what they actually choose, why these deviate, and how selection behaviour can be better predicted.

How the brain solves complicated problems
Dr J.P. (Jelmer) Borst (m), University of Groningen – Artificial Intelligence
In this project, a simulation will be made of how people process complicated problems - problems such as algebra - in their brains. To understand the brain's information processing, the scientists will use two new methods of analysis. Such a simulation can help to train people better in solving these types of problems.

Design for success
Dr L.E.A. (Laura) Braden (f), Erasmus University Rotterdam — Arts and Culture Studies
Interdisciplinary approaches are increasingly emphasised, yet little is known of the effect on workers. This study will examine strategies designers use in integrating different disciplines to craft successful careers. Studying how creative work is accomplished under divergent disciplinary standards aids understanding larger shifting values within modern work.

Tourism in Places of Conflict: A Study of the Emotional Dynamics of Dark Tourism in the Palestinian West Bank
Dr D.M. (Dorina Maria) Buda (f), University of Groningen - Cultural Geography
‘Dark tourism' refers to tourism in areas were conflicts and cruelties take place. In this project, I will investigate how the emotional and affective dynamics between tourists and local stakeholders give shape to the identity of conflict areas. In this, I focus on tourists' experiences in the Palestinian West Bank of the Jordan River.

Some like it hot
Dr B. (Benny) Guralnik (m), Wageningen University
Temperature is a primary governor of innumerable natural processes, but is very difficult to unravel in the past. This project will calibrate and extend several cutting-edge luminescence and noble-gas techniques, with the aim of reconstructing thermal histories of archaeological fireplaces, and understanding the evolution of fire harnessing.

Deterministic modelling in multiple dimensions.
Dr (Ivan) Kryven (m), University of Amsterdam - Mathematics/Computer Science
Formation of planets out of the interstellar dust, emergence of tiny crystals, or growth of your network of friends: regardless colossal difference in the scales and the worlds, hidden similarities stand behind evolution of large populations. I will develop mathematical
tools to help natural scientists to understand, simulate, and foresee these phenomena.

Mathematics helps people with vascular diseases
Dr J. (Julia) Mikhal (f), University of Twente, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science
Aneurysms or stenoses in the brain form an important pathology that affects numerous people and forms a risk of life-threatening haemorrhage or blockage. Mathematical models will support the treatment process by providing qualitative insights into the future course of the disease and in finding optimal treatment solutions.

Dynamical neural networks in health and disease: panta rhei
Dr W.M. (Willem) Otte (m), University Medical Center Utrecht - Image Sciences Institute
An understanding of the function and operation of networks, requires insight into dynamic changes, especially at central intersections. Using a new method, I will characterise this dynamic in the brain - a complex and rapidly changing network like no other - both in a healthy state and after brain damage.

Glycoflux – from diagnosis to galactose
Dr M. (Monique) van Scherpenzeel (f), Radboudumc – Translational Metabolic Laboratory
Galactose presents a paradox: galactose is poisonous, it is thought to accelerate the ageing process, and it is deadly for yeast cells with a defective phosphoglucomutase (PGM1). But PGM1 patients would appear, by contrast, to get better from galactose. The researcher wants to understand the reason for this and to try to find a similar solution to comparable diseases.

Opening the door to therapeutic proteins to fight cancer
Dr W.P.R. (Wouter) Verdurmen (m), Radboudumc – Department of Biochemistry
Therapeutic proteins are suitable as medicines for many types of cancer, but they must be delivered to the tumour in sufficient quantities. To study this release process, tumours will be grown on a chip and strategies will be tested to improve the release, which will improve the effectiveness of the proteins as medicines.

How do our actions shape our perception?
Dr F. (Fleur) Zeldenrust (f), Radboud University Nijmegen – Donders Institute
We move our bodies in response to our experiences and our experiences are affected by how we move our bodies. The researchers will study this interaction using mathematical models and computer simulations using the whiskers of rodents as a model system. 

Naar boven